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2020–21 United States Senate election in Georgia

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2020–21 United States Senate election in Georgia

← 2014 November 3, 2020 (first round)
January 5, 2021 (runoff)
2026 →
Reporting
99%
as of January 11, 2021, 7:12 p.m. EST[1][2]
  Jon Ossoff on Showtime (cropped).png David Perdue, Official Portrait, 114th Congress (cropped).jpg
Nominee Jon Ossoff David Perdue
Party Democratic Republican
First round 2,374,519
47.95%
2,462,617
49.73%
Runoff 2,268,612
50.61%
2,213,604
49.39%

Georgia Senate Election Results by County, 2020.svg
First round county results
Perdue:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Ossoff:      50–60%      60–70%      80–90%

U.S. senator before election

David Perdue
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Jon Ossoff
Democratic

The 2020–21 United States Senate election in Georgia was held on November 3, 2020 and on January 5, 2021 (as a runoff), to elect the Class II member of the United States Senate to represent the State of Georgia. Democrat Jon Ossoff defeated incumbent Republican Senator David Perdue in the runoff election. The general election was held concurrently with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as with other elections to the Senate, elections to the U.S. House of Representatives and various state and local elections.

No candidate received a majority of the vote during the general election on November 3, so the top two finishers—Perdue (49.73%) and Ossoff (47.95%)—advanced to a runoff election, held on January 5, 2021. The runoff was held concurrently with the special election for the Georgia U.S. Senate seat held by Republican Kelly Loeffler and challenged by Raphael Warnock, which had also advanced to a runoff, and which Warnock won. Following the 2020 U.S. Senate elections, Republicans held 50 Senate seats and the Democratic caucus held 48, including two independents who caucus with the Democrats. These runoffs decided control of the United States Senate under the incoming Biden administration. In the event that the Democrats won both seats, Democratic vice president-elect Kamala Harris's tiebreaking vote would give the Democrats a majority. The extraordinarily high political stakes caused the races to attract significant attention nationwide and globally.

On January 6, 2021, most major news outlets projected Ossoff the winner.[3][4] Perdue conceded the race on January 8.[5][6] According to the Center for Responsive Politics, this campaign was the most expensive in U.S. Senate history, with over $468 million spent.[7] Ossoff's victory, along with Warnock's, will give the Democrats control of the Senate for the first time since 2015. When Ossoff takes office, he will be the first Democrat elected to a full term in the Senate from Georgia since Max Cleland, who held this seat from 1997 to 2003.

Republican primary

Candidates

Nominee

Withdrawn

Declined

Results

Republican primary results, June 9, 2020[13]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Perdue (incumbent) 992,555 100.00%
Total votes 992,555 100.00%

Democratic primary

Candidates

Nominee

Eliminated in primary

Withdrew

Declined

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Sarah Riggs
Amico
Jon
Ossoff
Teresa
Tomlinson
Other Undecided
Landmark Communications June 1, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 9% 42% 14% 7%[a] 28%
Cygnal (R) May 28–30, 2020 510 (LV) ± 4.3% 8% 49% 16% 4%[b] 24%
The Progress Campaign (D)[1] May 6–15, 2020 1,162 (LV) 9% 46% 29% 16%[c]
The Progress Campaign (D)[2] March 12–21, 2020 913 (RV) ± 4.6% 18% 34% 21% 27%[d]
University of Georgia March 4–14, 2020 807 (LV) ± 3.4% 15% 31% 16% 39%

Head-to-head polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Jon
Ossoff
Teresa
Tomlinson
Undecided
Cygnal (R) May 28–30, 2020 510 (LV) ± 4.3% 58% 24% 18%

Endorsements

Jon Ossoff
Federal officials
State officials
County officials
Local Officials
Organizations
Individuals
Teresa Tomlinson
Federal officials
State officials
Local officials
Individuals
Organizations

Results

County results

Almost four times as many Georgia voters participated in the 2020 Democratic Senate primary as in the 2016 Democratic Senate primary, when only 310,053 votes were cast.[53]

Democratic primary results, June 9, 2020[54]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jon Ossoff 626,819 52.82%
Democratic Teresa Tomlinson 187,416 15.79%
Democratic Sarah Riggs Amico 139,574 11.76%
Democratic Maya Dillard-Smith 105,000 8.85%
Democratic James Knox 49,452 4.17%
Democratic Marckeith DeJesus 45,936 3.87%
Democratic Tricia Carpenter McCracken 32,463 2.74%
Total votes 1,186,660 100.00%

Other candidates

Libertarian Party

Nominee

Independents

Withdrawn

Debates

The first debate between Hazel, Ossoff, and Perdue occurred virtually[62] on October 12.[63]

A second debate between Ossoff and Perdue, held on October 28[e] in Savannah and aired on television station WTOC-TV,[64] was more heated and made national headlines, with Ossoff saying that Perdue had claimed "COVID-19 was no deadlier than the flu", was "looking after [his] own assets, and ... portfolio", and that Perdue voted "four times to end protections for preexisting conditions".[65] Ossoff also called Perdue a "crook" and criticized him for "attacking the health of the people that [he] represent[s]".[66] Perdue said Ossoff will "say and do anything to my friends in Georgia to mislead them about how radical and socialist" his agenda is.[67] Video of the exchange went viral.[62][66]

The next day, October 29, Perdue said he would not attend the third and final debate, previously scheduled to be broadcast on WSB-TV on November 1; instead Perdue decided to attend a rally with President Trump in Rome on the same day[68]—"as lovely as another debate listening to Jon Ossoff lie to the people of Georgia sounds",[67] according to a Perdue spokesman.

On December 6, Ossoff debated an empty podium as Perdue declined to participate in a Georgia Public Broadcasting-held debate.[69] Ossoff criticized Perdue's absence, accusing him of skipping the event because of the negative response to his performance in the October debates.

General election

Predictions

Source Ranking As of
DDHQ[70] Tossup October 3, 2020
538[71] Tossup October 29, 2020
Inside Elections[72] Tossup October 28, 2020
Sabato's Crystal Ball[73] Tossup October 29, 2020
RCP[74] Tossup September 27, 2020
The Cook Political Report[75] Tossup October 29, 2020
Economist[76] Tossup September 23, 2020
Niskanen[77] Tossup September 15, 2020
Politico[78] Tossup November 2, 2020
Daily Kos[79] Tossup October 30, 2020

Endorsements

David Perdue (R)
U.S. Executive Branch officials
U.S. Senators
U.S. Governors
Organizations
Unions
Individuals
Jon Ossoff (D)
U.S. Executive Branch officials
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
State legislators
State officials
County officials
Local officials
Organizations
Unions
Individuals

Polling

Graphical summary

Aggregate polls

Source of poll
aggregation
Dates
administered
Dates
updated
David
Perdue

Republican
Jon
Ossoff

Democratic
Other/
Undecided
[f]
Margin
270 To Win October 14, 2020 October 29, 2020 45.4% 47.8% 6.8% Ossoff +2.4
Real Clear Politics October 14, 2020 October 28, 2020 48.5% 49.3% 7.3% Ossoff +0.8
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[g]
Margin
of error
David
Perdue (R)
Jon
Ossoff (D)
Shane
Hazel (L)
Other /
Undecided
Landmark Communications November 1, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 49% 47% 3% 1%[h]
Swayable October 27 – November 1, 2020 407 (LV) ± 6.4% 49% 48% 3%
Data for Progress October 27 – November 1, 2020 1,036 (LV) ± 3% 46% 51% 3% 0%[i]
Emerson College October 29–31, 2020 749 (LV) ± 3.5% 49%[j] 51% 3%[k]
Morning Consult October 22–31, 2020 1,743 (LV) ± 2.0% 46% 47%
Landmark Communications October 28, 2020 750 (LV) ± 3.6% 47% 47% 3% 3%[l]
Public Policy Polling October 27–28, 2020 661 (V) 44% 47% 3% 6%[m]
Monmouth University October 23–27, 2020 504 (RV) ± 4.4% 46% 49% 2% 2%[n]
504 (LV)[o] 47% 49%
504 (LV)[p] 48% 49%
Swayable October 23–26, 2020 342 (LV) ± 7.2% 49% 48% 3%
Civiqs/Daily Kos October 23–26, 2020 1,041 (LV) ± 3.4% 46% 51% 2% 2%[q]
YouGov/CBS October 20–23, 2020 1,090 (LV) ± 3.4% 47% 46% 6%[r]
University of Georgia October 14–23, 2020 1,145 (LV) ± 4% 45% 46% 4% 5%[s]
Landmark Communications October 21, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 50% 45%
Citizen Data October 17–20, 2020 1,000 (LV) ± 3% 41% 47% 12%[t]
Morning Consult October 11–20, 2020 1,672 (LV) ± 2.4% 46% 44%
Emerson College October 17–19, 2020 506 (LV) ± 4.3% 46% 45% 9%[u]
Siena College/NYT Upshot October 13–19, 2020 759 (LV) ± 4.1% 43% 43% 4% 10%[v]
Opinion Insight (R)[A] October 12–15, 2020 801 (LV) ± 3.46% 45%[w] 45% 8%[x]
Garin-Hart-Yang Research Group (D)[y] October 11–14, 2020 600 (LV) 43% 48% 6% 3%[z]
Quinnipiac University October 8–12, 2020 1,040 (LV) ± 3.0% 45% 51% 3%[aa]
SurveyUSA October 8–12, 2020 677 (LV) ± 5.7% 46% 43% 11%[ab]
Data for Progress October 8–11, 2020 782 (LV) ± 3.5% 43% 44% 1% 10%
Morning Consult October 2–11, 2020 1,837 (LV) ± 2.3% 46% 42%
Public Policy Polling October 8–9, 2020 528 (V) ± 4.3% 43% 44% 4% 9%[ac]
Landmark Communications October 7, 2020 600 (LV) ± 4% 47% 46% 2% 6%[ad]
University of Georgia September 27 – October 6, 2020 1,106 (LV) ± 2.9% 49% 41% 3% 7%[ae]
Civiqs/Daily Kos September 26–29, 2020 969 (LV) ± 3.5% 46% 48% 3% 3%[af]
Hart Research Associates (D)[B] September 24–27, 2020 400 (LV) ± 4.9% 49% 46%
Quinnipiac University September 23–27, 2020 1,125 (LV) ± 2.9% 48% 49% 2%[ag]
Redfield & Wilton Strategies September 23–26, 2020 789 (LV) ± 3.49% 42% 47% 12%[ah]
YouGov/CBS September 22–25, 2020 1,164 (LV) ± 3.4% 47% 42% 10%[ai]
Monmouth University September 17–21, 2020 402 (RV) ± 4.9% 48% 42% 4% 6%[aj]
402 (LV)[o] 48% 43% 3% 5%[ak]
402 (LV)[p] 50% 42% 2% 4%[al]
Siena College/NYT Upshot September 16–21, 2020 523 (LV) ± 4.9% 41% 38% 5% 16%[am]
University of Georgia September 11–20, 2020 1,150 (LV) ± 4% 47% 45% 4% 5%[an]
Morning Consult September 11–20, 2020 1,406 (LV) ± (2% – 7%) 43%[ao] 44%
Data For Progress (D) September 14–19, 2020 800 (LV) ± 3.5% 43% 41% 2% 14%[ap]
Morning Consult September 8–17, 2020 1,402 (LV)[aq] ± (2% – 4%) 43% 43%
GBAO Strategies (D)[C] September 14–16, 2020 600 (LV) 48% 49%
Redfield & Wilton Strategies September 12–16, 2020 800 (LV) ± 3.46% 43% 43% 14%[ar]
Fabrizio Ward/Hart Research Associates[D] August 30 – September 5, 2020 800 (LV) ± 3.5% 47% 48% 5%[as]
Opinion Insight/American Action Forum[A] August 30 – September 2, 2020 800 (LV) ± 3.46% 45%[at] 44% 11%[au]
HarrisX (D)[E] August 20–30, 2020 1,616 (RV) ± 2.4% 47% 40% 8% 4%[av]
Public Policy Polling August 13–14, 2020 530 (V) ± 4.1% 44% 44% 11%[aw]
Garin-Hart-Yang Research (D)[F] August 10–13, 2020 601 (LV) ± 4.0% 46% 48% 6%
SurveyUSA August 6–8, 2020 623 (LV) ± 5.3% 44% 41% 14%[ax]
YouGov/CBS July 28–31, 2020 1,101 (LV) ± 3.4% 45% 43% 13%[ay]
HIT Strategies (D)[G] July 23–31, 2020 400 (RV) ± 4.9% 39% 42% 19%[az]
Monmouth University July 23–27, 2020 402 (RV) ± 4.9% 49% 43% 1% 7%[ba]
402 (LV)[o] 50% 43% 1% 6%[bb]
402 (LV)[p] 51% 43% 1% 6%[bc]
Morning Consult July 17–26, 2020 1,337 (LV) ± 3.0% 45% 42% 12%
Spry Strategies (R)[H] July 11–16, 2020 700 (LV) ± 3.7% 46% 44% 10%[bd]
Garin-Hart-Yang Research (D)[F] July 9–15, 2020 800 (LV) ± 3.5% 44% 45% 11%
Gravis Marketing (R)[I] July 2, 2020 513 (LV) ± 4.3% 48% 43% 9%
FOX News June 20–23, 2020 1,013 (RV) ± 3.0% 45% 42% 13%[be]
Public Policy Polling June 12–13, 2020 661 (V) ± 3.4% 44% 45% 11%
Civiqs/Daily Kos May 16–18, 2020 1,339 (RV) ± 3.1% 45% 47% 7%[bf]
The Progress Campaign (D)[3] May 6–15, 2020 2,893 (LV) ± 2.0% 42% 42% 16%
BK Strategies (R)[J] May 11–13, 2020 700 (LV) ± 3.7% 46% 41% 13%
Public Opinion Strategies (R) May 4–7, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 43% 41% 7% 8%[bg]
Cygnal (R)[4][K] April 25–27, 2020 591 (LV) ± 4.0% 45% 39% 16%
The Progress Campaign (D) March 12–21, 2020 3,042 (RV) ± 4.5% 39% 40% 20%
Hypothetical polling
with Teresa Tomlinson
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[g]
Margin
of error
David
Perdue (R)
Teresa
Tomlinson (D)
Other /
Undecided
Civiqs/Daily Kos May 16–18 1,339 (RV) ±3.1% 45% 44% 10%[bh]
The Progress Campaign (D)[5] May 6–15 2,893 (LV) ± 2% 41% 40% 19%
The Progress Campaign (D) March 12–21 3,042 (RV) ± 4.5% 40% 39% 21%
with Sarah Riggs Amico
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[g]
Margin
of error
David
Perdue (R)
Sarah Riggs
Amico (D)
Other /
Undecided
Civiqs/Daily Kos May 16–18 1,339 (RV) ±3.1% 45% 42% 13%[bi]
with Stacey Abrams
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[g]
Margin
of error
David
Perdue (R)
Stacey
Abrams (D)
Other /
Undecided
The Progress Campaign (D) March 12–21 3,042 (RV) ± 4.5% 41% 46% 12%
with Generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[g]
Margin
of error
David
Perdue (R)
Generic
Democrat
Other /
Undecided
SurveyUSA November 15–18, 2019 1,303 (LV) ± 3.2% 40% 37% 23%
University of Georgia October 28–30, 2019 1,028 (RV) 35.1% 21.1% 43.8%
with Generic Republican and Generic Democrat
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[g]
Margin
of error
Generic
Republican
Generic
Democrat
Other /
Undecided
Quinnipiac University September 23–27, 2020 1,125 (LV) ± 2.9% 48% 49% 3%[bj]
Global Strategy Group (D)[L] March 17–19, 2019 603 (LV) ± 4.0% 40% 42% 18%

Results

No candidate received a majority of the vote on November 3, so the top two finishers—incumbent Republican senator David Perdue (49.73%) and Democratic challenger Jon Ossoff (47.95%)—advanced to a runoff election held on January 5, 2021.[126][127]

Voters whose mail-in ballots were rejected were allowed to submit corrections until 5pm on November 6.[128][129]

2020 United States Senate election in Georgia[130]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican David Perdue (incumbent) 2,462,617 49.73% −3.16%
Democratic Jon Ossoff 2,374,519 47.95% +2.74%
Libertarian Shane T. Hazel 115,039 2.32% +0.42%
Total votes 4,952,175 100.00%

Runoff

The runoff election between Perdue and Ossoff was on January 5, 2021,[131] alongside the special election for the Georgia U.S. Senate seat held by Republican Kelly Loeffler.

Following the 2020 Senate elections, Republicans held 50 Senate seats and the Democratic caucus 48.[132] If Democrats won both Georgia runoffs, their caucus would gain control of the Senate, as the resultant 50–50 tie would be broken by Democratic vice president–elect Kamala Harris. If the Democrats lost either race, Republicans would retain control of the Senate.[133] The high political stakes caused the races to attract significant nationwide attention.[134][135][136] These elections are the third and fourth Senate runoff elections to be held in Georgia since runoffs were first mandated in 1964, following runoffs in 1992 and 2008.[citation needed] It is also the third time that both of Georgia's Senate seats have been up for election at the same time, following double-barrel elections in 1914 and 1932.[citation needed]

The deadline for registration for the runoff election was December 7, 2020. Absentee ballots for the runoff election were sent out beginning on November 18, and in-person voting began on December 14.[137][138]

Polling

Aggregate polls

Source of poll
aggregation
Dates
administered
Dates
updated
David
Perdue

Republican
Jon
Ossoff

Democratic
Undecided
[bk]
Margin
270 To Win Dec 15 – January 3, 2020 January 4, 2021 47.4% 50.2% 2.4% Ossoff +2.8
RealClearPolitics Dec 14 – January 4, 2020 January 5, 2021 48.8% 49.3% 1.9% Ossoff +0.5
538 Nov 9 – January 4, 2020 January 4, 2021 47.4% 49.1% 3.5% Ossoff +1.8
Average 47.9% 49.5% 2.6% Ossoff +1.6

This section also contains pre-runoff polls excluding all candidates except Ossoff and Perdue.

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size[g]
Margin
of error
David
Perdue (R)
Jon
Ossoff (D)
Undecided
Trafalgar Group January 2–4, 2021 1,056 (LV) ± 2.9% 49% 49% 2%
AtlasIntel January 2–4, 2021 857 (LV) ± 3% 47% 51% 2%
Insider Advantage January 3, 2021 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 48.7% 48.6% 2.7%
National Research Inc January 2–3, 2021 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 45% 46% 9%
University of Nevada Las Vegas Lee Business School December 30, 2020 – January 3, 2021 550 (LV) ± 4% 49% 48% 3%
Targoz Market Research December 30, 2020 – January 3, 2021 713 (LV) ± 3.7% 50% 50% 0%
1,342 (RV) 47% 51% 2%
AtlasIntel December 25, 2020 – January 1, 2021 1,680 (LV) ± 2% 47% 51% 2%
Gravis Marketing December 29–30, 2020 1,011 (LV) ± 3.1% 47% 50% 3%
JMC Analytics and Polling December 28–29, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 45% 53% 2%
Trafalgar Group December 23–27, 2020 1,022 (LV) ± 3.0% 48% 50% 2%
Open Model Project December 21–27, 2020 1,405 (LV) ± 4.7% 50% 46% 4%
InsiderAdvantage December 21–22, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 49% 48% 3%
Mellman Group December 18–22, 2020 578 (LV) ± 4.1% 47% 50% 3%
Reconnect Research/Probolsky Research December 14–22, 2020 1,027 (LV) ± 4% 43% 42% 15%
SurveyUSA December 16–20, 2020 600 (LV) ± 5.1% 46% 51% 3%
Trafalgar Group December 14–16, 2020 1,064 (LV) ± 3.0% 50% 48% 2%
Emerson College December 14–16, 2020 605 (LV) ± 3.9% 51% 48% 1%
Wick December 10–14, 2020 1,500 (LV) 51% 47% 2%
RMG Research December 8–14, 2020 1,417 (LV) ± 2.6% 47% 49% 4%
InsiderAdvantage December 14, 2020 500 (LV) ± 4.4% 49% 48% 3%
Baris/Peach State Battleground Poll December 4–11, 2020 1,008 (LV) ± 3.1% 45% 47% 9%
Trafalgar Group December 8–10, 2020 1,018 (LV) ± 3.0% 49% 49% 2%
Fabrizio Ward/Hart Research Associates November 30 – December 4, 2020 1,250 (LV) ± 3.2% 46% 48% 6%
Trafalgar Group December 1–3, 2020 1,083 (LV) ± 2.9% 47% 48% 5%
SurveyUSA November 27–30, 2020 583 (LV) ± 5.2% 48% 50% 2%
RMG Research November 19–24, 2020 1,377 (LV) ± 2.6% 47% 48% 5%
Data For Progress (D) November 15–20, 2020 1,476 (LV) ± 2.6% 50% 48% 3%
InsiderAdvantage November 16, 2020 800 (LV) ± 3.5% 49% 49% 2%
Remington Research Group November 8–9, 2020 1,450 (LV) ± 2.6% 50% 46% 4%
Garin-Hart-Yang Research Group (D)[bl] October 11–14, 2020 600 (LV) 45% 50% 5%
Data For Progress (D) September 14–19, 2020 800 (LV) ± 3.5% 44% 44% 12%

Results

2021 United States Senate election in Georgia runoff
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jon Ossoff
Republican David Perdue (incumbent)
Total votes
Democratic gain from Republican

Ossoff won the inner ring of the Atlanta area by a larger margin than in the general, which was more than enough to overcome Perdue winning more counties. He won Cobb and Gwinnett counties, which had recently swung Democratic, by over 40,200 and 74,200 votes, respectively, with both exceeding his statewide margin of 32,800 votes.[139]

See also

Notes

Partisan clients
  1. ^ a b The American Action Forum is a 501 organisation which usually supports Republican candidates
  2. ^ Poll sponsored by The Human Rights Campaign, which endorsed Biden before this poll's sampling period.
  3. ^ Poll sponsored by Warnock's campaign for the 2020–21 United States Senate special election in Georgia.
  4. ^ Poll sponsored by AARP.
  5. ^ Poll sponsored by Matt Lieberman's campaign
  6. ^ a b Poll sponsored by Ossoff's campaign
  7. ^ This poll’s sponsor, DFER, primarily supports Democratic candidates
  8. ^ This poll's sponsor is the American Principles Project, a 501 that supports the Republican Party.
  9. ^ Poll is sponsored by OANN, a far-right political talkshow.
  10. ^ This poll was sponsored by the Republican State Leadership Committee.
  11. ^ Poll conducted for the Speaker of Georgia's House Republican caucus
  12. ^ Poll sponsored by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee
Voter samples and additional candidates
  1. ^ "Another candidate" with 7.2%
  2. ^ Knox with 1.5%; DeJesus and Smith with 1%; McCracken with 0.3%
  3. ^ Listed as "other/undecided"
  4. ^ Includes undecided
  5. ^ Initially scheduled for October 19.[62]
  6. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear
  8. ^ Undecided with 1%
  9. ^ "Other candidate or write-in" with 0%
  10. ^ With voters who lean towards a given candidate
  11. ^ "Someone else" with 3%
  12. ^ Undecided with 3%
  13. ^ Undecided with 6%
  14. ^ "Other candidate" and "No one" with 0%; Undecided with 2%
  15. ^ a b c With a likely voter turnout model featuring higher turnout than in the 2016 presidential election
  16. ^ a b c With a likely voter turnout model featuring lower turnout than in the 2016 presidential election
  17. ^ "Someone else" and Undecided with 1%
  18. ^ "Someone else" with 2%; Undecided with 4%
  19. ^ Undecided with 5%
  20. ^ "Other" with 5%; Undecided with 8%
  21. ^ "Someone else" with 3%; Undecided with 6%
  22. ^ "Someone else" and would not vote with 1%; "Undecided/Refused" with 8%
  23. ^ With voters who lean towards a given candidate
  24. ^ "Someone else" and did/would not vote with 1%; "Undecided/Refused" with 6%
  25. ^ Poll sponsored by Ossoff's campaign
  26. ^ Undecided with 3%
  27. ^ "Someone else" with 0%; Undecided with 3%
  28. ^ "Some other candidate" with 3%; Undecided with 8%
  29. ^ Undecided with 9%
  30. ^ Undecided with 6%
  31. ^ Undecided with 7%
  32. ^ "Someone else" with 1%; Undecided with 2%
  33. ^ "Someone else" with 0%; Undecided with 2%
  34. ^ "Another Third Party/Write-in" with 3%; Undecided with 9%
  35. ^ "Someone else" with 2%; Undecided with 8%
  36. ^ "Other" and "No one" with 0%; Undecided with 6%
  37. ^ Undecided with 5%
  38. ^ Undecided with 4%
  39. ^ "Someone else" and would not vote with 0%; "Undecided/Refused" with 16%
  40. ^ Undecided with 5%
  41. ^ Overlapping sample with the previous Morning Consult poll, but more information available regarding sample size
  42. ^ Undecided with 14%
  43. ^ Additional data sourced from FiveThirtyEight
  44. ^ "Another Third Party/Write-in" with 3%; Undecided with 11%
  45. ^ Would not vote with 1%; Undecided with 4%
  46. ^ With voters who lean towards a given candidate
  47. ^ Would not vote with 2%; Undecided with 9%
  48. ^ Would not vote with 4%
  49. ^ Undecided with 11%
  50. ^ "Some other candidate" with 4%; Undecided with 10%
  51. ^ "Someone else" with 3%; Undecided with 10%
  52. ^ "Third party candidate" with 3%; would not vote with 2%; Undecided with 14%
  53. ^ Undecided with 7%
  54. ^ Undecided with 6%
  55. ^ Undecided with 6%
  56. ^ "Another candidate" with 4%; Undecided with 6%
  57. ^ Undecided with 8%; "Other" with 3%; would not vote with 2%
  58. ^ "Someone else" with 4%; Undecided with 3%
  59. ^ "Undecided" with 8%
  60. ^ "Someone else" with 6%; Undecided with 4%
  61. ^ "Someone else" with 8%; Undecided with 5%
  62. ^ Undecided with 3%
  63. ^ Calculated by taking the difference of 100% and all other candidates combined.
  64. ^ Poll sponsored by Ossoff's campaign

References

  1. ^ "Georgia Senate runoff election results 2021". ABC News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  2. ^ "Georgia Senate Runoff Election Results". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
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Further reading

External links

Official campaign websites