Page semi-protected

2021 storming of the United States Capitol

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

2021 storming of the United States Capitol
Part of the 2020–21 United States election protests and attempts to overturn the 2020 United States presidential election
Clockwise from top: A crowd pressing in to the Capitol at the Eastern entrance; Donald Trump speaking to supporters at the "Save America" rally; crowd is appearing to retreat from tear gas; tear gas being deployed outside the Capitol Building; protesters gathering outside the Capitol
DateJanuary 6, 2021 (2021-01-06)
Location
38°53′23.3″N 77°00′32.6″W / 38.889806°N 77.009056°W / 38.889806; -77.009056Coordinates: 38°53′23.3″N 77°00′32.6″W / 38.889806°N 77.009056°W / 38.889806; -77.009056
Caused by
Goals
MethodsRioting,[1] vandalism,[2] looting,[2] assault,[3] shootings,[4] arson,[5] and attempted bombings[6]
Resulted in
Casualties and arrests
Death(s)5 dead[15]
Injuries
  • Unknown number of rioters injured, at least 5 rioters hospitalized[20]
  • 56 officers injured[21][22]
Arrested

The 2021 storming of the United States Capitol was a riot and violent attack against the 117th United States Congress on January 6, 2021, carried out by supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump's attempts to overturn his defeat in the 2020 presidential election.[25] After attending a rally organized by Trump, thousands[26] of his supporters marched down Pennsylvania Avenue[27] before many stormed[28] the U.S. Capitol in an effort to disrupt the Electoral College vote count during a joint session of Congress and prevent the formalization of President-elect Joe Biden's election victory. Breaching police perimeters, rioters then occupied, vandalized,[29][30] looted, and ransacked[31] parts of the building for several hours.[32][33][34] The breach led to the evacuation and lockdown of the Capitol building, as well as five deaths.[35][36]

Called to action by Trump,[37] his supporters gathered in Washington, D.C. on January 5 and 6 in support of his false claim that the 2020 election had been "stolen" from him,[38] and to demand that Vice President Mike Pence and Congress reject Biden's victory.[39][40][41] At a January 6 "Save America March" on the Ellipse, Trump,[42][43] Donald Trump Jr., Rudy Giuliani, and several members of Congress incited a crowd of Trump supporters.[44] Trump told them to "fight like hell" to "take back our country"[45][46] and encouraged them to march over to the Capitol.[34] Giuliani called for "trial by combat"[47] and Trump Jr. threatened the president's opponents by saying "we're coming for you", having called for "total war" in the weeks leading up to the riots.[48][49] After marching to the Capitol building and overwhelming thinly manned police barricades, many protesters became violent; they assaulted Capitol Police officers and reporters, erected a gallows on the Capitol grounds, chanted "Hang Mike Pence", and attempted to locate lawmakers to take hostage and harm, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Pence, the latter for refusing to invalidate Trump's electoral loss.[50][51][52][53][54]

As the rioters entered the Capitol by breaking through doors and windows, Capitol security evacuated the Senate and House of Representatives chambers. Several buildings in the Capitol complex were evacuated, and all were locked down.[55] Rioters broke past interior security to occupy the empty Senate chamber while federal law enforcement officers drew handguns to defend the evacuated House floor.[56][57][58] The offices of many members of Congress, include Speaker Pelosi's, were looted and vandalized.[59][60][61] Improvised explosive devices were found on the Capitol grounds, as well as at offices of the Democratic National Committee, the Republican National Committee, and in a nearby vehicle.[62][63] Five people, including a Capitol Police officer, died from the events, while dozens more were injured.[64]

Trump initially resisted sending the District of Columbia National Guard to quell the mob.[65] He posted a video on his Twitter account calling the rioters "great patriots", telling them to "go home in peace" and repeating his election claims.[66][67] The crowd was dispersed from the Capitol later that evening. The counting of the electoral votes resumed and was completed in the early morning hours. Pence declared Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris victors and affirmed that they will assume office on January 20. Pressured by his administration, the threat of removal, and numerous resignations, Trump held a televised speech where he committed to an orderly transition of power in a statement.[68][69][70][71] Three days later on January 9, it was reported that Trump told White House aides that he regretted this statement and that he would not resign from office.[72]

The events were widely condemned by political leaders and organizations in the United States and internationally. Speaking in Congress immediately following their return to the floor, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) called the storming of the Capitol a "failed insurrection" and finally confirmed that Trump's claim of election fraud were false. Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) called for Trump to be removed from office, through the 25th Amendment or by impeachment.[73] Facebook locked Trump's accounts and removed posts related to the incident; Twitter initially locked his account for 12 hours before permanently suspending it.[74][75]

The storming of the Capitol was variously described as treason,[76] insurrection, sedition, domestic terrorism,[77] and an attempt to carry out a self-coup[78] or coup d'état against the co-equal Legislative Branch of the Federal government of the United States by Trump, the Chief Executive of the Executive branch.[79][80] In one poll, one in five registered voters approved of the storming, and 30 percent of Republicans polled called those who participated "patriots".[81]

Background

President Donald Trump during a campaign rally in 2020

While there have been other attacks and bombings of the Capitol in the 19th and 20th centuries, the 2021 riot was the first time that the Capitol had been breached or occupied since the 1814 burning of Washington by the British Army during the War of 1812,[82][83][84][85] and the first time that a U.S. President had ordered an attack against the Capitol.[82]

Democratic candidate Joe Biden won the 2020 United States presidential election, defeating the incumbent Republican president Donald Trump, on November 3, 2020.[86] Before, during, and after the counting of votes, Trump and other Republicans attempted to overturn the election, alleging widespread voter fraud. The claims focused mainly on five swing statesMichigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Georgia and Arizona – that flipped to Biden after having been won by Trump in 2016.[87]

Actions undertaken by Trump to try to overturn the results included filing at least 60 lawsuits that sought to nullify election certifications and void votes cast for Biden in each of the five states (all but one being defeated, including two brought to the Supreme Court, due to lack of evidence or standing); mounting pressure campaigns toward Republican state lawmakers to nullify results, replace slates of Biden electors with those declared to Trump, and/or manufacture evidence of fraud (which would likely violate certain election tampering statutes enacted by the states); and demanding lawmakers investigate election irregularities or conduct signature matches of mail-in ballots (regardless of efforts already undertaken during vote counting). Trump also personally inquired about, but did not act upon, invoking martial law to "re-run" the election in the swing states that Biden won (which would violate federal law prohibiting election oversight by the U.S. military, and likely be considered an unconstitutional suspension of civil liberties) and hiring a special counsel to find incidences of fraud (even though federal and state officials have concluded that such cases were very isolated or non-existent).[87]

Congress was scheduled to meet on January 6, 2021, to count the results of the Electoral College vote and certify the winner of the election. Trump had spent previous days suggesting that Vice President Mike Pence should reject Biden's victory, an act that is not within Pence's constitutional powers as vice president and president of the Senate, and he repeated this call in his speech on the morning of January 6.[88] The same afternoon, Pence released a letter to Congress in which he said he would not challenge Biden's victory.[88][89]

Planning of the storming

Trump announced plans for a rally before the January 6 vote count to continue his challenge to the validity of several states' election results. On December 18, Trump announced on Twitter, "Big protest in D.C. on January 6th. Be there, will be wild!"[90][91] The "Save America March" and rally that preceded the riots at the Capitol were largely organized by Women for America First, a 501(c)(4) organization chaired by Amy Kremer.[92] Women for America First invited its supporters to join a caravan of vehicles traveling to the event.[92] Event management for Trump's speech was carried out by Event Strategies, a company founded by Tim Unes, who worked for Trump's 2016 presidential campaign.[92]

Ali Alexander, a right-wing political activist who took part in organizing the rally and expressed support for the storming as "completely peaceful" was reported as saying in December that Representatives Paul Gosar (R, AZ-4), Andy Biggs (R, AZ-5) and Mo Brooks (R, AL-5) were involved in the planning of "something big".[93] According to Alexander, "It was to build momentum and pressure and then on the day change hearts and minds of Congress peoples who weren't yet decided or who saw everyone outside and said, 'I can't be on the other side of that mob.'" His remarks received considerably more scrutiny after the events of January 6, causing Biggs to respond with a statement denying any relationship between himself and Alexander.[94][95][96]

The rioters had openly planned to disrupt the counting of Electoral College ballots for several weeks prior to the event, and had called for violence against Congress, Pence, and law enforcement.[97] Plans were coordinated on "alt-tech" platforms – distinct from larger social media platforms such as Reddit or Twitter, which have implemented bans to censor violent language and images. Websites like TheDonald.win, founded after its predecessor was banned from Reddit, the social networking service Parler, the chat app Telegram, Gab, and others, were used to discuss previous Trump rallies and to make plans for storming the Capitol.[98][99][100] Many of the posters planned for violence prior to the event, with some individuals discussing how to avoid police on the streets, which tools to bring to help pry open doors, and how to smuggle weapons into Washington D.C.[101] Following clashes with Washington D.C police during protests on December 12, 2020, the Proud Boys and far-right groups turned against supporting law enforcement.[91] At least one group, Stop the Steal, posted on December 23, 2020, its plans to occupy the Capitol with promises to "escalate" if met with opposition from law enforcement.[102]

Funding and donations

Women for America First, the 501(c)(4) organization chaired by Amy Kremer which organized the "Save America March", is funded by America First Policies, a dark money group chaired by Linda McMahon, the former Administrator of the Small Business Administration.[92] Conspiracy theorist Alex Jones said his media company paid $500,000 to book the Ellipse for the pro-Trump rally immediately preceding the riots and claimed that the Trump White House asked him to lead the march to the Capitol.[103]

Charlie Kirk, the founder of Turning Point USA, said on Twitter that Turning Point had sent over 80 buses to the U.S. Capitol.[104] Ginni Thomas, lobbyist and wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, serves on their advisory council;[105][106] some sources have implied that she personally funded the buses.[107][108] This assertion has since been debunked.[109]

Other people attempted to raise funds in December via GoFundMe to help pay for transportation to the rally, with limited success.[110] An investigation by BuzzFeed News identified more than a dozen fundraisers to pay for travel to the planned rally. GoFundMe has since deactivated several of the campaigns after the riot, but some campaigns had already raised part or all of their fundraising goals prior to deactivation.[111]

Prior intelligence and concerns of violence

In the days leading up to the storming, several organizations that monitored online extremism had been issuing warnings about the event.[112] On December 21, 2020, a U.K. political consultant who studies Trump-related extremism tweeted a forecast of what the planned event of January 6 would become, including deaths.[113] On December 29, 2020, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) issued at least one bulletin to law enforcement agencies across the country, warning of the potential of armed protesters targeting legislatures.[114]

The Anti-Defamation League published a January 4 blog post warning about violent rhetoric being espoused by Trump supporters leading up to the Electoral College count, including calls to violently disrupt the counting process. The post said that it was not aware of any credible threats of violence, but noted that "if the past is any indication, the combination of an extremist presence at the rallies and the heated nature of the rhetoric suggests that violence is a possibility."[112][115] Also on January 4, British security firm G4S conducted a risk analysis, which found that there would be violent groups in Washington, D.C., between January 6 and Inauguration Day based on online posts advocating for violence.[112][116] Advance Democracy, Inc., a nonpartisan governance watchdog, found 1,480 posts from QAnon-related accounts referencing the events of January 6 in the six days leading up to it, including calls for violence.[112]

Police preparations

Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser requested on December 31, 2020, that District of Columbia National Guard troops be deployed to support local police during the anticipated demonstrations. In her request, she wrote that the guards would not be armed and that they would be primarily responsible for "crowd management" and traffic direction, allowing police to focus on security concerns. Acting Secretary of Defense Christopher C. Miller approved the request on January 4, 2021. The approval activated 340 troops, with no more than 114 to be deployed at any given time.[117]

The FBI spoke to over a dozen known extremists and "was able to discourage those individuals from traveling to D.C.," according to a senior FBI official. The FBI shared information with the Capitol Police in advance of the protest.[118]

Three days before the riots, the Pentagon twice offered to send in the National Guard, but were told by the United States Capitol Police that it would not be necessary.[119] Robert Contee, the acting Chief of the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia, said after the event that his department had possessed no intelligence indicating the Capitol would be breached.[120] United States Capitol Police chief Steven Sund said his department had developed a plan to respond to "First Amendment activities" but had not planned for the "criminal riotous behavior" they encountered.[120] As a result, Capitol Police staffing levels mirrored that of a normal day and officers did not prepare Riot control equipment. [121] U.S. Secretary of the Army Ryan D. McCarthy said law enforcement agencies' estimates of the potential size of the crowd, calculated in advance of the event, varied between 2,000 and 80,000.[119] On January 5, the National Park Service estimated that 30,000 people would attend the "Save America Rally", based on people already in the area.[122]

Events in Washington, D.C.

Prior to the march

Thousands of attendees gathered in Freedom Plaza on January 5, 2021, in advance of protests planned for the week.[123] At least ten people were arrested, several on weapons charges, on the night of January 5 and into the morning of January 6.[57]

"Save America March"

Protesters at Washington Union Station in the morning on January 6

Protesters surrounded the Washington Monument to rally on the morning of January 6. Trump, his lawyer and adviser Rudy Giuliani, and others, such as Chapman University School of Law professor, John C. Eastman, gave speeches on the Ellipse. Giuliani addressed the crowd, repeating conspiracy theories that voting machines used in the election were "crooked" and calling for "trial by combat".[124][125] Representative Mo Brooks told the crowd, "Today is the day American patriots start taking down names and kicking ass."[126] Representative Madison Cawthorn (R, NC-11) said, "This crowd has some fight."[127]

Trump gave a speech from behind a glass barrier, declaring he would "never concede" the election, criticizing the media and calling for Pence to overturn the election results, something outside Pence's constitutional power.[88][128]

Trump incited his supporters to march on the Capitol, where Congress meets:

We're going to walk down. Anyone you want, but I think right here, we're going to walk down to the Capitol – And we're going to cheer on our brave senators and congressmen and women and we're probably not going to be cheering so much for some of them. Because you'll never take back our country with weakness. You have to show strength and you have to be strong. We have come to demand that Congress do the right thing and only count the electors who have been lawfully slated. Lawfully slated. I know that everyone here will soon be marching over to the Capitol building to peacefully and patriotically make your voices heard.[34]

Stop the Steal signs seen in front of the Capitol

Referring to the counting of Biden's electoral votes, Trump said, "we can't let that happen".[129] Trump told his supporters to "fight. We fight like hell. And if you don't fight like hell, you're not going to have a country anymore." He said the protesters would be "going to the Capitol and we're going to try and give [Republicans] the kind of pride and boldness that they need to take back our country".[46] Trump's speech, replete with misrepresentations and lies, inflamed the crowd.[130]

Trump's sons, Donald Jr. and Eric, also spoke, naming and verbally attacking Republican congressmen and senators who were not supporting the effort to challenge the Electoral College vote, and promising to campaign against them in future primary elections.[131] Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) greeted protesters with a raised fist as he passed by on his way to the joint session of Congress in the early afternoon.[132][133]

Rioting in the Capitol building

Pennsylvania Avenue march

Protesters gathering outside the United States Capitol

Instigated by Trump to help him overturn the election result, a crowd marched down Pennsylvania Avenue after the rally and advanced on the Capitol, where a separate crowd had gathered.[134] It is difficult to get a reliable estimate of the total size of the crowd because aerial photos are not permitted in Washington, D.C., due to security concerns.[135]

Around 1:00 p.m. EST, hundreds of Trump supporters clashed with officers and pushed through barriers along the perimeter of the Capitol.[136][137] The crowd swept past barriers and officers, with some members of the mob spraying officers with chemical agents or hitting them with lead pipes.[1][138] Although many rioters simply walked to the walls of the Capitol, some resorted to ropes and makeshift ladders.[139] Representative Zoe Lofgren (D, CA-19), aware that rioters had reached the Capitol steps, was unable to reach Steven Sund by phone; House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul D. Irving told Lofgren the doors to the Capitol were locked and "nobody can get in".[140]

Meanwhile Sund, at 1:09 p.m., called Irving and Stenger and asked them for an emergency declaration required to call in the National Guard; they both told Sund they would "run it up the chain". Irving called back with formal approval an hour later.[27]

Capitol breach

A gallows that was built outside the United States Capitol

Just after 2:00 p.m., windows were broken through, and the mob breached the building and entered the National Statuary Hall.[1][58][141][142] As rioters began to storm the Capitol and other nearby buildings, some buildings in the complex were evacuated.[57] Outside the building, the mob put up a gallows, punctured the tires of a police vehicle, and left a note saying "PELOSI IS SATAN" on the windshield.[1] Politico reported some rioters briefly showing their police badges or military identification to law enforcement as they approached the Capitol, expecting therefore to be let inside; a Capitol Police officer told BuzzFeed News that one rioter told him "[w]e're doing this for you" as he flashed a badge.[120]

Concerned about the approaching mob, Representative Maxine Waters (D, CA-43) called Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund, who was not on Capitol grounds but at the police department's headquarters. When asked what the Capitol Police were doing to stop the rioters, Sund told Waters, "We're doing the best we can" just before the line went dead.[140]

Several rioters carried plastic handcuffs, possibly with the intention of using them to take hostages.[97][143][144] Some of the rioters carried Confederate battle flags[1][145][146][147] or Nazi emblems.[148][149][150][151] Some rioters wore riot gear, including helmets and military-style vests. For the first time in U.S. history, a Confederate battle flag was displayed inside the U.S. Capitol building.[152][153][154]

Senate adjourned and evacuated

At the time, the joint session of Congress – which had already voted to accept the nine electoral votes from Alabama and three from Alaska without objection – was split so that each chamber could separately consider an objection to accepting Arizona's electoral votes that had been raised by Representative Paul Gosar and endorsed by Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX). Both chambers were roughly halfway through their two-hour debate on the motion.[155][156]

C-SPAN broadcast of the Senate going into recess after protesters infiltrate the Capitol

While debate over the Arizona electoral college votes continued, an armed police officer entered the Senate chamber, positioned facing the back entrance of the chamber. Pence handed the floor from Senator Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) to Senator James Lankford (R-OK). Moments later, Pence was escorted out by members of the Secret Service. The rioters began to climb the steps towards the Senate chamber. A lone police officer worked to slow the mob down as he radioed that they had reached the second floor. Just steps from the still-unsealed Senate chamber doors, the rioters instead followed the Capitol Police officer who led them away from the Senate. Banging could be heard from outside as people attempted to breach the doors. As Lankford was speaking, the Senate was gaveled into recess, and the doors were locked at 2:15 p.m. A minute later, the rioters reached the gallery outside the chamber.[140][157] A police officer carrying a semi-automatic weapon appeared on the floor and stood between Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY).[158] Senator Mitt Romney (R-UT) exasperatedly threw up his hands and directly criticized several fellow Republicans who were challenging President-elect Biden's electoral votes, yelling to them, “This is what you've gotten, guys."[159] With violence breaking out, Capitol security advised the members of Congress to take cover.[160][161] Several members of Senate parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough's staff carried the boxes of Electoral College votes and documentation out of the chamber to hidden safe rooms within the building.[162][163]

Due to security threat inside: immediately, move inside your office, take emergency equipment, lock the doors, take shelter.

—Capitol Police alert[140]

Trump tweeted that Pence "didn't have the courage to do what should have been done" at 2:24 p.m. Afterwards, Trump followers on far-right social media called for Pence to be hunted down, and the mob began chanting, "Where is Pence?" and "Find Mike Pence!"[164][165][166] Outside, the mob chanted, "Hang Mike Pence!,"[167] which some crowds continued to chant as they stormed the Capitol;[168][169] at least three rioters were overheard by a reporter saying they wanted to find Pence and execute him as a "traitor" by hanging him from a tree outside the building.[170] All buildings in the complex were subsequently locked down, with no entry or exit from the buildings allowed. Capitol staff were asked to move into offices and lock their doors and windows; those outside were advised to "seek cover".[55]

As the mob roamed the Capitol, lawmakers, aides, and staff took shelter in offices and closets. Aides to Mitch McConnell, barricaded in a room just off a hallway, heard a rioter outside the door "praying loudly", asking for "the evil of Congress [to] be brought to an end".[140] The rioters entered and ransacked the office of the Senate Parliamentarian.[171]

People inside the Capitol being evacuated. Staff and reporters inside the building were taken by secure elevators to the basement, and then to an underground bunker constructed following the 2001 attempted attack on the Capitol. Evacuees were redirected while en route after the bunker was also infiltrated by the mob.[172]

The Senate chamber was evacuated at 2:30 p.m.[172][173] After evacuation, the mob briefly took control of the chamber, with some armed and armored men carrying flex-cuffs and some posing with raised fists on the Senate dais that Pence had left minutes earlier.[1][174] Pence's wife Karen Pence, daughter Charlotte Pence Bond, and brother Greg Pence (a member of the House; R, IN-6) were in the Capitol at the time it was attacked.[175]

Michael C. Stenger, Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate, accompanied a group of senators including Lindsey Graham and Joe Manchin to a secure location in a Senate office building. Once safe, the lawmakers were "furious" with Stenger; Graham asked him, "How does this happen? How does this happen?" and added that they "[are] not going to be run out by a mob."[140] After the evacuation, reporter Nicholas Fandos spent four hours in a secure location within the Capitol that police asked him not to share.[176]

House adjourned and evacuated

Meanwhile, in the House chamber around 2:15 p.m., while Gosar was speaking, Speaker Pelosi was escorted out of the chamber. The House was gaveled into recess, but would resume a few minutes later.[177][178] Amid the security concerns, Representative Dean Phillips (D, MN-3) yelled, "This is because of you!" at his Republican colleagues.[179] The House resumed debate around 2:25 p.m. Around 2:30, when Gosar finished speaking, the House went into recess again. The rioters had entered the House wing and were attempting to enter the Speaker's Lobby just outside the House chamber. Lawmakers were still inside and being evacuated.[180] Members of Congress inside the House chamber were told to put on gas masks, as law enforcement had begun using tear gas within the building.[177][181] Reporter Emily Cochrane pulled out one of the aluminum bags that were stored under the chairs for emergencies and removed the emergency hood, "a sort of hybrid gas mask with a tarp, which made a loud whirring noise and had a flashing red light."[176] Staff members removed boxes of sealed electoral vote certificates to prevent them from being damaged by rioters.[161][182][183]

Video shot inside the House of Representatives chamber with armed security blocking the doors

ABC News reported that shots were fired within the Capitol building.[181][184] An armed standoff took place at the front door of the chamber of the House of Representatives: as the mob attempted to break in, federal law enforcement officers drew their guns inside[1] and pointed them towards the chamber doors, which were barricaded with furniture.[185] In a stairway, one officer fired a shot at a man coming toward him.[186] Photographer Erin Schaff said that, from the Capitol Rotunda, she ran upstairs, where rioters grabbed her press badge. Police found her, and, as her press pass had been stolen, they held her at gunpoint before her colleagues intervened.[176]

Multiple rioters documented themselves occupying the Capitol and the offices of various representatives,[187][188][189] storming the offices of Speaker Pelosi.[190][191]

Participating groups

Supporters of the boogaloo movement, the Three Percenters, the Proud Boys, the Oath Keepers, QAnon, the Groyper Army, and National-anarchism, as well as Neo-Confederates and Black Hebrew Israelites, among others, were reportedly present or wore emblematic gear or symbols during the riots. Neo-Nazi apparel was also worn by some participants during the riots, including a shirt emblazoned with references to the Auschwitz–Birkenau concentration camp and its motto, Arbeit macht frei (German for "work makes you free").[192] Following the event, members of the Nationalist Social Club, a neo-Nazi street gang, detailed their participation in the storming and claimed the acts were the "beginning of the start of White Revolution in the United States".[193]

The Associated Press reviewed public and online records of more than 120 participants after the storming and found that many of them shared conspiracy theories about the 2020 presidential election on social media and had also believed other beliefs shared by the QAnon conspiracy theory. Additionally, several had threatened Democratic and Republican politicians before the storming.[194] The event was described as "Extremely Online", with "pro-Trump internet personalities" and fans livesteaming and taking selfies.[195]

At least thirteen Republican current and former state legislators were present at the event, including Nevada State Assemblywoman Annie Black, Virginia State Senator Amanda Chase, Maryland Delegate Daniel L. Cox, Alaska State Representative David Eastman, West Virginia Delegate Derrick Evans, Missouri State Representative Justin Hill, Arizona State Representative Mark Finchem, Michigan State Representative Matt Maddock, Pennsylvania State Senator Doug Mastriano, and Tennessee Representative Terri Lynn Weaver, as well as outgoing Georgia State Representative Vernon Jones (a former Democrat who announced at the rally that he had joined the Republican Party), outgoing Arizona State Representative Anthony Kern, and former Pennsylvania State Representative Rick Saccone. Weaver claimed to have been "in the thick of it", while Evans filmed himself entering the Capitol alongside rioters. All denied participating in acts of violence.[196][197][198] Evans was charged by federal authorities on January 8 with entering a restricted area;[199] he resigned from the House of Delegates the next day.[200]

A Department of Defense official said some military members on active and reserve duty may have been involved in the riot.[201] Police officers and a police chief from departments in multiple states are under investigation for their alleged involvement in the riot.[202] Two Capitol Police officers were suspended, one for directing rioters inside the building while wearing a MAGA hat, and the other for taking a selfie with a rioter.[203][204]

Improvised explosive and incendiary devices

Improvised explosive devices were found in several locations in Washington, D.C. A device suspected to be a pipe bomb was discovered adjacent to a building containing Republican National Committee (RNC) offices at around 12:45 p.m. A search of the nearby area found another suspected pipe bomb under a bush at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters, and it was reported about 30 minutes later.[6][205] The devices were of a similar design – about one foot in length, having end caps and wiring apparently attached to a timer, and containing an unknown powder and some metal – and they were believed to have been planted prior to the riots.[205][206] Both the RNC building and the DNC headquarters are a few blocks from the Capitol.[207]

The RNC and DNC devices were safely detonated by bomb squads, and police later said they were "hazardous" and could have caused "great harm".[6] The FBI distributed a photo of the person who they believe planted the devices and issued a reward of up to $50,000 for information.[206] Another suspected pipe bomb was found on the grounds of the Capitol complex.[208] Sund told The Washington Post on January 10 that he suspected the pipe bombs were intentionally placed to draw police away from the Capitol.[27]

A vehicle containing a semi-automatic rifle and a cooler full of eleven Molotov cocktails was also found nearby.[209][210] The driver was subsequently arrested.[211] He also had three handguns in his possession at the time of his arrest.[212]

Law enforcement response

Armed guards walking through the halls of Congress after they were ransacked

Sund joined a conference call with D.C. government and Pentagon officials at 2:26 p.m. where he "[made] an urgent, urgent immediate request for National Guard assistance", telling them he needed "boots on the ground". However, Lt. Gen. Walter E. Piatt said he could not recommend that Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy approve the request, telling Sund and others "I don't like the visual of the National Guard standing a police line with the Capitol in the background".[27]

About 2:31 p.m. on January 6, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser ordered a 6:00 p.m. curfew to go into effect that night.[213] Virginia Governor Ralph Northam also issued a curfew for nearby Alexandria and Arlington County in Northern Virginia.[214][215]

Pentagon officials reportedly restricted D.C. guard troops from being deployed except as a measure of last resort, and from receiving ammunition and riot gear; troops were also instructed to engage with protesters only in situations warranting self-defense and could not share equipment with local police or use surveillance equipment without prior approval from Acting Defense Secretary Christopher C. Miller.[216][217] Army Secretary Ryan D. McCarthy and Acting Defense Secretary Miller decided to deploy the entire 1,100-strong force of D.C. National Guard to quell violence.[218][219] About 3:04 p.m., Miller spoke with Pence, Pelosi, McConnell and Schumer, and directed the National Guard and other "additional support" to respond to the riot.[220][218][221] The order to send in the National Guard, which Trump initially resisted, was approved by Vice President Pence.[218][222] This bypassing of the chain of command has not been explained.[223] Around 3:30 p.m., Northam said that he was working with Mayor Bowser and Congress leaders to respond and that he was sending members of the Virginia National Guard and 200 Virginia State Troopers to support D.C. law enforcement, at the mayor's request.[224] At 3:45 p.m., Stenger told Sund he would ask Mitch McConnell for help expediting the National Guard authorization.[27]

It took more than three hours for police to retake control of the Capitol, using riot gear, shields, and batons. Capitol Police were assisted by the local D.C. Metropolitan Police Department.[1] Smoke grenades were deployed on the Senate side of the Capitol by Capitol Police working to clear rioters from the building.[225] Black officers employed with Capitol Police reported being subjected to racial epithets (including repeated uses of "nigger") by some of the rioters.[226] Capitol Police chief Steven Sund said his officers' slow response to the rioting was due to their being preoccupied by the improvised explosive devices found near the Capitol.[227] FBI and Department of Homeland Security agents wearing riot gear entered the Dirksen Senate Office Building around 4:30 p.m.[228]

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy announced at 4:57 p.m. that elements of the New Jersey State Police were being deployed to the District of Columbia at the request of D.C. officials, and that the New Jersey National Guard was prepared for deployment if necessary.[229] Shortly before 5:00 p.m., congressional leaders were reportedly being evacuated from the Capitol complex to Fort McNair, a nearby Army base.[230] Around 5:20 p.m., Maryland Governor Larry Hogan announced that he would send the Maryland State Police and Maryland National Guard, after speaking to the Secretary of the Army.[231][232] Hogan's requests of the Defense Department to authorize National Guard troops to be deployed at the Capitol initially were denied in multiple instances.[233] At around 5:40 p.m., the Sergeant at Arms announced that the Capitol had been secured.[234]

Riot police and protesters outside the Capitol in the evening

As police continued to try to push rioters away from the Capitol, protests continued, with some moving out of the Capitol Hill area. Some verbal and physical attacks on reporters were reported, with attackers denigrating media outlets as providing "fake news".[182] One rioter told a CNN crew as they were being harassed by others, "There's more of us than you. We could absolutely fucking destroy you!"[235]

By 6:08 p.m., police had arrested at least thirteen people and seized five firearms during the day's events.[236] Although Mayor Bowser had ordered a 6:00 p.m. curfew, it went largely ignored by the pro-Trump rioters, hundreds of whom remained in the Capitol Hill area two hours after the curfew went into effect.[237]

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo pledged to deploy a thousand members of the New York National Guard to D.C., in addition to the resources promised by other states.[238] On the night of January 6, Mayor Bowser issued an order extending the public emergency in Washington, D.C., for 15 days, writing in the order that she expected some people would "continue their violent protests through the inauguration".[239][240] The following day, Secretary of the Army Ryan D. McCarthy announced that a fence would be built around the Capitol, and remain in place for at least 30 days; construction of the fence began that same day. McCarthy also said New Jersey National Guard troops would be mobilized, as would troops from the Delaware, New York, and Pennsylvania National Guards.[12]

Completion of electoral vote count

Congressional staffers removed the Electoral College certificates from the Capitol as it was evacuated.

Congress reconvened after the Capitol was cleared of trespassers, with the Senate resuming its session at around 8:00 p.m. EST on January 6 to finish debating the objection to the Arizona electors. At 9:58 p.m., the Senate rejected the objection 93–6, with only six Republicans voting in favor: Ted Cruz (TX), Josh Hawley (MO), Cindy Hyde-Smith (MS), John Neely Kennedy (LA), Roger Marshall (KS), and Tommy Tuberville (AL).[241] At 11:08 p.m., the House of Representatives also rejected the motion by a margin of 303–121. All of the "yeas" came from Republicans while the "nays" were from 83 Republicans and 220 Democrats.[242] A planned objection to the Georgia slate of electors was rejected after co-signing Georgian senator, Kelly Loeffler, withdrew her support in light of the day's events.[243]

Another objection was raised by Hawley and Representative Scott Perry (R, PA-10) to the Pennsylvania slate of electors, triggering another two-hour split in the joint session to debate the objection.[244] At 12:30 a.m. on January 7, the Senate rejected this objection as well by a 92–7 vote, with the same people voting the same way as before with the exceptions of Senators Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) and Rick Scott (R-FL) voting in favor and John Kennedy voting against.[245]

At 3:08 a.m., the House of Representatives similarly rejected the motion to sustain the objection by a margin of 282–138. Again, all of the votes in favor were Republican, while this time, only 64 Republicans voted against and 218 Democrats voted against.[246] Representative Peter Meijer (R, MI-3) said that several of his Republican colleagues in the House would have voted to certify the votes, but did not out of fear for the safety of their families,[247] and that at least one specifically voted to overturn Biden's victory against their conscience because they were shaken by the mob attack that day.[248]

At 3:41 a.m., Congress confirmed the outcome of the Electoral College vote, Biden's 306 votes to Trump's 232, with Pence declaring that Biden and Harris would take office on January 20.[249][250][251][252]

Casualties

Capitol Police officer Brian D. Sicknick died "due to injuries sustained while on-duty".[253]

Five people died during or shortly after the event: one was a Capitol Police officer and four were among those who stormed or protested at the Capitol.[254] Fifteen police officers were hospitalized,[255] and more than 50 injured.[156] Congressman Tim Ryan, a Democrat from Ohio, alleged Capitol Police officers were hit in the head with lead pipes.[256]

Capitol Police officer Brian D. Sicknick, 42, a 15-year veteran of the force,[257] was "injured while physically engaging with protesters".[253] Law enforcement officials told The New York Times that he had been struck in the head with a fire extinguisher.[3] Reuters reported that Sicknick suffered a thromboembolic stroke after sustaining head injuries,[258] and collapsed after returning to his division office. He was later placed on life support,[3] but died the following day.[18][253] Sicknick's death will be investigated by the Metropolitan Police Department's Homicide Branch, the USCP, and federal authorities.[253] Pelosi, the House speaker, had the flags at the Capitol lowered to half-staff in Sicknick's honor.[259][260] Trump initially declined to lower flags at the White House or other federal buildings under his control, before relenting on Sunday.[261][262][263] Trump did not offer condolences to Sicknick's family, but Biden, Pence and Pelosi each did.[259][264]

After Sicknick's death was officially announced, Senator Ted Cruz received backlash for previous speeches that were perceived as calls for violence.[265]

During the riot, Ashli Elizabeth Babbitt, a 35-year-old Trump supporter[266][180][267] from San Diego, died after being shot in the neck by Capitol Police as she attempted to climb through a shattered window in a barricaded door leading into the Speaker's Lobby, which has direct access to the House floor.[266][180][268] The incident was recorded on several cameras.[268][180] A law enforcement official told The Washington Post that the police currently believe she had been unarmed, but the officer who fired the fatal shot did not know that at the time, and officers were aware that many of the intruders were carrying concealed weapons.[186] The officer who shot her was placed on administrative leave pending an investigation.[269] The D.C. Metropolitan Police Department launched an investigation into the death.[270] Babbitt was a follower of the pro-Trump QAnon conspiracy theory, and had tweeted the previous day "the storm is here", a reference to a QAnon prediction that Trump will expose and defeat a global cabal of perceived Satan-worshipping pedophiles.[271][272][273]

Three other people who were present at the Capitol Hill during the raid also died. They were Rosanne Boyland, 34, of Kennesaw, Georgia; Kevin Greeson, 55, from Athens, Alabama; and Benjamin Philips, 50, of Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania.[274][275][276] Boyland's cause of death was disputed; one account said she was crushed to death, while another said she collapsed while standing at the side in the Capitol rotunda.[277][278][279][280] Boyland's sister also said she "had no intention of committing violence when she traveled to Washington" and simply wanted to show her support.[279] Greeson died of a heart attack.[281] His family said he was "not there to participate in violence or rioting, nor did he condone such actions."[282] Philips died of a stroke.[281] The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that there was "no indication Philips himself participated in the raid on the Capitol."[283] Phillips had started the social media site Trumparoo, intended for Trump supporters.[284] A family member of Boyland spoke with WGCL-TV, opining that "the president's words incited a riot that killed four of his biggest fans last night".[285]

There were calls for Trump to be prosecuted for inciting the violence that led to the five deaths,[286][287] although it is not clear that the medical emergencies were due to violence. An article on Law & Crime discussed whether felony murder charges in relation to Babbitt's death could be brought against protesters, those who invaded the Capitol, or instigators of the rally. It concluded that such charges were very unlikely.[288]

Capitol Police officer Howard Liebengood, who responded to the riot, died on January 11.[289] Morale among the Capitol Police plummeted after the riots, with the department responding to several cases where officers threatened to harm themselves; one officer turned in her weapon because she feared what she would do with it.[19]

Threats against the lives of government officials

The rioters had made plans that included abducting and killing senior politicians, including Vice President Pence and Speaker Pelosi. Several rioters said they were seeking to hang Pence as a "traitor."[54] Rioters were heard chanting "Hang Mike Pence."[290]

Damage, theft, and impact

A damaged window in one of the rooms in the Capitol

Rioters stormed the offices of Nancy Pelosi, flipping tables and ripping photos from walls;[190][191] the office of the Senate Parliamentarian was ransacked;[171] art was looted;[1] and urine and feces were tracked into several hallways.[225][291] Windows were smashed throughout the building, leaving the floor littered with glass and debris.[1][292] Some items of furniture were damaged, turned over, or stolen.[292] One door had "MURDER THE MEDIA" scrawled onto it.[293] Rioters damaged Associated Press recording and broadcasting equipment outside the Capitol after chasing away reporters.[294] Rioters also destroyed a display honoring the life of congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis.[295] A photo of Representative Andy Kim (D, NJ-3) cleaning up the damage at the Rotunda after midnight went viral.[296]

The rioters caused extensive physical damage, with Capitol Police officers reporting that the building had been "trashed".[1][225] The Office of the Architect of the Capitol (AOC), which maintains the Capitol and preserves its art and architecture, released an initial damage assessment on January 9. The AOC reported interior damage from the riot (specifically broken glass, broken doors, and graffiti), and also reported that some statues, paintings, and historic benches "displayed the residue of various pepper sprays, tear gas and fire extinguishers deployed by both rioters and law enforcement personnel."[297] Items, including portraits of John Quincy Adams and James Madison, as well as a marble statue of Thomas Jefferson, were covered in "corrosive gas agent residue"; these were sent to the Smithsonian for assessment and restoration.[298] A 19th-century marble bust of President Zachary Taylor was defaced with what seemed to be blood, but the most important works in the Capitol collection, such as the John Trumbull paintings, escaped unharmed.[292][297] On the Capitol's exterior, two 19th-century bronze light fixtures designed by Frederick Law Olmsted were damaged.[297] Because the Capitol is not insured against loss, taxpayers will pay for the damage inflicted by the siege.[293]

A laptop owned by Senator Jeff Merkley (D-OR) was stolen.[299] A laptop taken from Speaker Pelosi's office was "[a] laptop from a conference room ... that was only used for presentations", according to Pelosi's deputy chief of staff.[300] Representative Ruben Gallego (D, AZ-7) said "we have to do a full review of what was taken, or copied, or even left behind in terms of bugs and listening devices."[120] Military news website SOFREP reported that "several" Secret‑level laptops were stolen, some of which had been abandoned while still logged in to SIPRNet, causing authorities to temporarily shut down SIPRNet for a security update on January 7 and leading the United States Army Special Operations Command to re-authorize all SIPRNet-connected computers on January 8.[301][302] Representative Anna Eshoo (D, CA-17) said in a statement that "[i]mages on social media and in the press of vigilantes accessing congressional computers are worrying" and that she had asked the Chief Administrative Officer of the House (CAO) "to conduct a full assessment of threats based on what transpired".[303] The CAO said it was "providing support and guidance to House offices as needed".[300]

Signs, flags, stickers, Nancy Pelosi's damaged nameplate, and other items left behind from the riot will be preserved as historical artifacts in the collections of the House and Senate and those of national museums.[298]

ABC News reported that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) had recovered several improvised explosive devices that were intended to cause serious harm, and were looking at those in the mob that were trained perhaps in the military and more intent on causing serious harm, including harming Vice President Pence. ABC analyst and retired CIA officer Mick Mulroy said the FBI would likely be conducting a full counterintelligence sweep on all those who participated in the assault to determine possible foreign intelligence ties, as these individuals may have taken sensitive information from the congressional offices they ransacked.[304][305] The presence of several military veterans who took part in the assault has created growing concern among former military members.[306]

Reactions

President Trump

Actions during the riot

Donald Trump's statement during the storming of the Capitol on January 6, 2021. The video was originally posted on Twitter and shared on other social media before being removed from all platforms for violating various policies.

Trump, who had spent previous weeks promoting the "Saving America" rally,[307] was "initially pleased" when his supporters breached the Capitol and refused to intercede,[308] but also "expressed disgust on aesthetic grounds" over the "low class" appearance of the supporters involved in the rioting.[309] Senator Ben Sasse (R-NE) said that senior White House officials told him that Trump was "delighted" to hear that rioters were entering the Capitol.[310] Staffers reported that Trump had been "impossible to talk to throughout the day," and that his inability to deal with his election loss and displeasure that his supporters were unsuccessful in overturning the result by force had, according to one staffer, made Trump "out of his mind."[311] Concerned that Trump may have committed treason through his actions, White House Counsel Pat Cipollone reportedly advised administration officials to avoid contact with Trump and ignore any illegal orders that could further incite the storming to limit their prosecutorial liability under the Sedition Act of 1918.[312]

Shortly after 2:00 p.m. EST, as the riot was ongoing and after senators had been evacuated from the Senate floor, Trump placed calls to Republican senators (first Mike Lee of Utah, then Tommy Tuberville of Alabama), asking them to make more objections to the counting of the electoral votes to try to overturn the election.[313] At 2:47 p.m., as his supporters violently clashed with police at the Capitol, Trump tweeted, "Please support our Capitol Police and Law Enforcement. They are truly on the side of our Country. Stay peaceful!"[314]

By 3:10 p.m., pressure was building on Trump to condemn supporters engaged in the riots; Trump's former communications director, Alyssa Farah, called upon him to "Condemn this now" and wrote "you are the only one they will listen to."[314] By 3:25 p.m., Trump tweeted "I am asking for everyone at the U.S. Capitol to remain peaceful. No violence! Remember, WE are the Party of Law & Order – respect the Law and our great men and women in Blue," but did not call upon the crowd to disperse.[314] By 3:40 p.m., a number of congressional Republicans called upon Trump to more specifically condemn violence and to call on his supporters to end the occupation of the Capitol: House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R, CA-23) said that he had spoken to Trump to ask him to "calm individuals down"; Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) issued a tweet telling Trump that "it is crucial you help restore order by sending resources to assist the police and ask those doing this to stand down"; and Representative Mike Gallagher (R, WI-8), in a video message, told Trump to "call it off".[314] In contrast to Trump, who only called upon his supporters to "remain peaceful", Pence called for the occupation of the Capitol to end immediately.[314]

By 3:50 p.m., White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany said that the National Guard and "other federal protective services" had been deployed.[314] At 4:06 p.m. on national television, President-elect Biden called for President Trump to end the riot. At 4:22 p.m., Trump issued a video message on social media that was later taken down by Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. In it, he praised his supporters and repeated his claims of electoral fraud, saying: "This was a fraudulent election, but we can't play into the hands of these people. We have to have peace. So go home. We love you. You're very special. You've seen what happens. You see the way others are treated that are so bad and so evil. I know how you feel. But go home and go home in peace."[66][314]

At 6:25 p.m., Trump tweeted: "These are the things and events that happen when a sacred landslide election victory is so unceremoniously & viciously stripped away from great patriots who have been badly & unfairly treated for so long" and then issued a call: "Go home with love & in peace. Remember this day forever!"[314][67][315][316]

At 7:00 p.m., Rudy Giuliani placed a second call to Lee's number and left a voicemail intended for Tuberville urging him to make more objections to the electoral votes as part of a bid "to try to just slow it down". Giuliani said: "I know they're reconvening at 8 tonight, but it ... the only strategy we can follow is to object to numerous states and raise issues so that we get ourselves into tomorrow – ideally until the end of tomorrow."[313]

Subsequent actions

Shortly after Congress certified Biden's victory, Trump's Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications and Director of Social Media, Dan Scavino, issued a statement from Trump saying, "Even though I totally disagree with the outcome of the election, and the facts bear me out, nevertheless there will be an orderly transition on January 20th. I have always said we would continue our fight to ensure that only legal votes were counted. While this represents the end of the greatest first term in presidential history, it's only the beginning of our fight to Make America Great Again!"[317]

In a video statement released on January 7, Trump condemned the violence at the Capitol, saying that "a new administration will be inaugurated", which was widely seen as a concession, and that his "focus now turns to ensuring a smooth, orderly, and seamless transition of power" to the Biden administration.[318][319] Vanity Fair reported that Trump was at least partially convinced to do so by Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), who told Trump that a sufficient number of Senate Republicans would support removing him from office unless he conceded.[71] White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany had attempted to distance the administration from the rioters' behavior in a televised statement earlier in the day.[320] On January 9, The New York Times reported that Trump had told White House aides that he regretted committing to an orderly transition of power and would not resign from office.[72]

Trump's acknowledgment of his electoral defeat was met with opposition and hesitation from some of his supporters. Pro-Trump and far-right political commentators Nick Fuentes and Cassandra Fairbanks said Trump had "throw[n] his supporters under the bus" while QAnon conspiracy theorists performed a numerological reading of the time stamps in Trump's video statement and deemed there was a secret encoded message; Politico highlighted previously pro-Trump users of Parler calling Trump a "dildo".[321]

Vice President Pence

A Trump–Pence sign on a city street corner smashed after the storming of the Capitol.

Pence tweeted at 3:35 p.m. on January 6, "This attack on our Capitol will not be tolerated and those involved will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law".[322] He later spoke to the Senate when they reconvened on the night of January 6, saying, "Today was a dark day in the United States Capitol ... To those who wreaked havoc in our Capitol today, you did not win. Violence never wins. Freedom wins. And this is still the People's House."[323][324]

According to sources close to the Vice President, Trump never reached out to Pence or inquired about his safety during the riot, even as protesters inside the Capitol were seeking him out and chanting "Where is Pence?"[325][326] Aides believed that Pence was being set up as a scapegoat for Trump's failure to overturn the results of the election.[327] Pence was described as very angry with Trump, and as of January 9, the two had not spoken since the incident.[328]

President-elect Biden

External video
video icon Comments by President-elect Joe Biden, January 6, 2021, C-SPAN

On January 6 at 4:06 p.m., President-elect Joe Biden addressed the nation from Wilmington, Delaware, calling the events an insurrection and borderline sedition, and said that "our democracy is under unprecedented assault".[329][330] He called upon Trump to go on national television and demand an end to the protests.[331][332] The following day Biden said the attack constituted domestic terrorism.[333]

Vice President-elect Harris

Minutes after Biden's initial condemnation of the riots, Vice President-elect Kamala Harris reiterated the President-elect's comments, writing that the protests were an "assault on the Capitol and our nation's public servants".[334]

Congress

Schumer's speech following the riot, during the reconvening of Congress later that evening

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell broke rank with the President and called the storming of the Capitol a "failed insurrection" and said "we are back at our posts, we will discharge our duty under the Constitution and for our nation. And we're going to do it tonight."[335] Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called upon Trump to "demand that all protesters leave the U.S. Capitol and Capitol Grounds immediately".[336] Schumer, in his speech following the resuming of Senate business, labelled those participating in the storming of the Capitol as "domestic terrorists" whose actions will be a "stain on our country not so easily washed away".[337] Pelosi later said, following her announcement that the electoral vote count would proceed during the evening of January 6, "let us pray that this instigation to violence will provide an epiphany for our country to heal".[338]

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said, "What happened at the US Capitol yesterday was an insurrection against the United States, incited by the president. This president should not hold office one day longer." He called on Mike Pence to invoke Section 4 of the 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that enables power to be transferred from the president to the vice-president if the president is deemed incapable of handling duties.[339]

First-year U.S. Representative Cori Bush (D, MO-1) tweeted her intent to introduce a resolution calling for the expulsion of "Republican members of Congress who have incited this domestic terror attack through their attempts to overturn the election".[340][341]

Representative Adam Kinzinger (R, IL-16) condemned the violence and described the events as a "coup attempt".[80] Representative Liz Cheney (R-WY), the Chair of the House Republican Conference (the third-ranking member of the House Republican leadership), said "No question the President formed the mob, the President incited the mob, the President addressed the mob. He lit the flame."[342] Newly-sworn-in Representative Nancy Mace (R, SC-1), who had worked for the President's 2016 campaign, said that "everything that he's worked for ... all of that – his entire legacy – was wiped out" by the violence.[343] Representative Mike Gallagher remarked of the riots that he had "not seen anything like this since I deployed to Iraq".[344] Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R, WA-5), who had planned to oppose the certification of the electoral vote, announced that she would no longer object to the Electoral College results after witnessing the "disgraceful and un-American" events of January 6.[345] She was joined by senators Kelly Loeffler, James Lankford, Steve Daines (R-MT), Marsha Blackburn (R-TN), and Mike Braun (R-IN), all of whom reversed course on the issue of contesting the electoral vote after witnessing the violence of the mob.[346]

Senator Mitt Romney said, "What happened at the U.S. Capitol today was an insurrection, incited by the President of the United States" and part of "an unprecedented attack on our democracy".[347] Senator Ben Sasse (R-NE) said, "This violence was the inevitable and ugly outcome of the president's addiction to constantly stoking division."[348] Senator Pat Toomey (R-PA) took to the Senate floor to say, "We saw bloodshed because a demagogue chose to spread falsehoods and sow distrust of his own fellow Americans."[349] Senator Richard Burr (R-NC) said, "The President bears responsibility for today's events by promoting the unfounded conspiracy theories that have led to this point."[350] Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) condemned the protest and said, "Violence is always unacceptable. Even when passions run high. Anyone engaged in violence – especially against law enforcement – should be fully prosecuted."[351]

Cruz himself, as well as Senator Josh Hawley, were subsequently urged to resign by Senators Chris Coons (D-DE), Patty Murray (D-WA), and Ron Wyden (D-OR).[352] Criticism was also leveled against both senators for sending out fundraising messages while the events in Washington were unfolding.[353][354] First-year U.S. Representative Lauren Boebert (R, CO-3) – who, in another tweet, appeared to compare the events to the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War – also faced calls for expulsion from Congress and criminal prosecution after Twitter posts from her Twitter sent as House Representative and congressional staff were sheltering from the rioters surfaced, in which she disclosed that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had been escorted to the House chambers, a likely security risk as some rioters had intended to execute congresspersons and Vice President Pence.[355]

Former presidents

All four living former presidents – Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Jimmy Carter – denounced the storming of the Capitol, with Obama and Clinton condemning Trump for inciting the violence.[356] Bush, who has infrequently commented on national matters since leaving office in 2009, released a statement saying "This is how election results are disputed in a banana republic – not our democratic republic," adding that he was "appalled by the reckless behavior of some political leaders since the election and by the lack of respect shown today for our institutions, our traditions, and our law enforcement."[357] Obama wrote that "History will rightly remember today's violence at the Capitol, incited by a sitting president ... as a moment of great dishonor and shame for our nation". He called the violence "unsurprising", arguing that the Republican Party had promoted a "fantasy narrative" regarding the 2020 election results that culminated in the violent outburst.[358]

Other domestic reactions

Against rioters

Former attorney general William Barr, who had resigned days earlier, denounced the violence, calling it "outrageous and despicable", adding that the president's actions were a "betrayal of his office and supporters" and that "orchestrating a mob to pressure Congress is inexcusable."[359][360] Trump's former White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney urged the President to call a stop to the storming of the Capitol,[361] and later resigned from his post as the United States Special Envoy for Northern Ireland.[362] Jim Mattis, a former Marine general and Trump's first secretary of defense, and Tom Bossert, Trump's first homeland security adviser, condemned Trump for enabling the storming and destroying trust in the election.[363][364]

Terry Gainer, a former chief of the Capitol Police and former Senate sergeant-at arms, described the protests as unprecedented in law enforcement, declaring that "this is a much more hateful crowd incited by the president himself. It's definitely something new in our business."[365]

Former Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley condemned the pro-Trump riot as "wrong and un-American"[366] and, in a closed-door speech to Republican National Committee members the following day, criticized Trump's actions since Election Day.[367] On his MSNBC program Morning Joe, host Joe Scarborough, a former Republican congressman, called for the arrest of President Trump, Donald Trump Jr. and Rudy Giuliani for their role in inciting the crowd to storm the Capitol through their election fraud rhetoric.[368][369]

Former acting CIA director Michael Morell (2010–2013) said, "We should be calling what happened [on January 6] domestic terrorism."[370] Similarly, national security expert Bruce Hoffman also determined that the attack on the Capitol constituted "domestic terrorism".[371]

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell said: "I can no longer call myself a fellow Republican."[372]

Former New Jersey governor and Trump supporter Chris Christie was "absolutely sickened" by the riots.[373] The Austrian-born former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger compared the riot to Nazi Germany's Kristallnacht ("night of broken glass") of 1938, saying, "The broken glass was in the windows of the United States Capitol, but the mob did not just shatter the windows of the Capitol, they shattered the ideas we took for granted. They didn't just break down the doors of the building that housed American democracy, they trampled the very principles on which our country was founded."[374][375][376]

A number of U.S. foreign service and civil service officers used the State Department's "dissent channel" to request use of the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office, saying that "[f]ailing to publicly hold the president to account would further damage our democracy and our ability to effectively accomplish our foreign policy goals abroad."[377]

Support for rioters

The New York Times reported that Trump supporters in Congress, the media, and in conservative politics "downplayed the violence as acts of desperation by people who felt lied to by the news media and ignored by their elected representatives". Others asserted the violence was actually caused by people associated with antifa.[378] ABC News reported that conservative media outlets were clear that "the violence was indefensible", and that several conservative media outlets said that "liberal politicians and mainstream media outlets are more outraged when Trump supporters are violent than they were about civil rights demonstrations last summer", with Newsmax calling out the "hypocritical double standard on Trump vs. BLM protests".[379]

Ivanka Trump, the president's eldest daughter, was criticized for addressing the rioters as "American patriots" in a now-deleted tweet publicly urging the cessation of violence.[380]

Conservative media hosts – including Tucker Carlson, Sean Hannity, Greg Kelly, and Mark Levin – also sought to deflect responsibility from Trump supporters. Sinclair Broadcast Group provided a video segment to its owned and operated television stations in over 100 markets in which correspondent James Rosen reported "far-left infiltrators" had been involved, though he did not provide a source for the assertion.[381] Right-wing radio host Rush Limbaugh compared the rioters to the Founding Fathers of the United States.[382] Lou Dobbs criticized Capitol police for drawing guns "on American citizens, most of whom are patriots."[383] Television host Pete Hegseth defended the rioters, saying "they just love freedom" and that "people feel like the entire system is rigged against them".[384]

Members of the far-right group Proud Boys posted messages boasting and taking credit for causing "absolute terror".[385] Walter West II, the sergeant-at-arms of the Republican Party of Texas, was removed from his post after expressing support for the rioters on Facebook.[386]

On January 11, ABC News reported that the FBI was aware of plans for new armed protests at all 50 state capitols and the U.S. Capitol continuing through Inauguration Day on January 20.[387]

False flag conspiracy theories

Some Trump loyalists claimed that the incident was a false flag operation staged by antifa to implicate Trump supporters. In an apparent effort to shift blame for any violence on antifa, leaders of the Proud Boys had requested in posts on conservative-leaning microblogging service Parler that members of the extremist group attend the rally incognito wearing "all black" clothing synonymous with anti-fascist activists.[388] Facial recognition company XR Vision denied a report by Rowan Scarborough published in The Washington Times that its products had identified participants in the incursion as antifa activists, which was promoted by Fox News host Laura Ingraham and Representative Matt Gaetz (R, FL-1) and went viral among Trump supporters. The Washington Times removed the story from its website hours later and published a retraction. Similar false accusations of antifa false flag operations had circulated among Trump supporters since 2017.[389] The FBI said there was no evidence of antifa involvement in the mob incursion.[390]

Some far-right supporters of the event forcefully condemned those who said it is a false flag, hailing the storming as a great achievement for them and told them to own it.[391]

Opinion polling

A YouGov poll of 1,397 registered voters found that overall, 71% opposed the storming of the Capitol (while 21% supported it), and 62% believed that the storming should be considered a threat to democracy. Among Republicans, 45% of Republicans supported the storming, with 43% opposed. In contrast, 96% of Democrats and 67% of independents were opposed. Fifty-two percent of Republicans blamed Joe Biden for the incident.[392][393]

An Ipsos poll of 1,005 adults conducted between January 7–8, 2021, found that 70% of Americans disapproved of Trump's actions leading up to the assault on the Capitol, and 57% of Americans wanted Trump to be immediately removed for his role in the riots. 70% of respondents – including two-thirds of Republicans and Trump voters surveyed – described the participants as either "criminals" or "fools," 9% saw them as "concerned citizens" and 5% saw them as "patriots." Among 339 Trump voters surveyed, 70% opposed the storming by the rioting supporters, while 12% of all respondents supported their actions.[394]

A PBS NewsHour/Marist poll of 875 adults conducted on January 7, 2021, found that 18% of Republicans supported the riots. Generally, 88% of all respondents opposed or strongly opposed the rioters' actions, and 90% believed the perpetrators of the riot should face prosecution (with 17% of Republicans disagreeing); 63% of respondents felt Trump held "a great deal or good amount of blame" for the attack, while 69% of surveyed Republicans believed Trump bore "little or no fault." Support for Trump's removal from office was split, with 48% supporting it and 49% (including 51% of independent voters) opposed.[395]

Media coverage and criticism

Coverage of the storming of the Capitol – which preempted regular daytime and prime time programming scheduled for January 6 on ABC, NBC and CBS – gave CNN its most-watched day in its 40-year history, with its daytime coverage netting an average of 8.97 million viewers (vs. 5.74 million for Fox News, 5.59 million for MSNBC, 4.85 million for ABC and 3.7 million for CBS) and its prime time coverage topping out at 8.20 million viewers (vs. 7.38 million for MSNBC, 5.77 million for NBC, 4.88 million for ABC, 4.58 million for Fox News and 2.57 million for CBS).[396][397][398]

On January 7, David Bauder of the Associated Press wrote that "[m]edia outlets that appeal to conservatives offered condemnations, explanations[,] and deflections following the U.S. Capitol riot by President Donald Trump's supporters ... but little introspection".[379] Erik Wemple, a writer for The Washington Post, criticized Fox News conservative political commentator Tucker Carlson for what Wemple perceived as a "racist, riotous double standard" in his coverage of the storming compared to his coverage of the killing of George Floyd.[399]

Karen Attiah, another writer for the Post, argued that Western media would have reacted differently to the storming if it happened outside the United States.[400] Grady McGregor and Naomi Xu Elegant, writers for Fortune, criticized Chinese state media reports for using the storming to promote an anti-Hong Kong protest, antidemocratic, and anti-United States narrative.[401]

Oliver Darcy, a writer for CNN Business, suggested that multichannel television providers should be held to equal accountability as social media companies for promoting disinformation through their carriage of conservative news/opinion channels like Fox News, Newsmax TV and One America News Network (OAN).[402] On the January 8 edition of his eponymous Fox News program, Tucker Carlson falsely claimed that CNN "announced [through the opinion piece] that it is working to force the Fox News Channel off the air and run [the network] out of business," and that CNN staff had contacted five providers cited by Darcy as examples – CenturyLink Residential, Verizon Fios, Comcast, Charter Communications, Dish Network and CNN parent AT&T (which owns U-verse, AT&T TV and DirecTV) – about having Fox News removed from their lineups.[403]

On January 6, executives with radio broadcasting conglomerate Cumulus Media – whose roster of conservative talk pundits includes Dan Bongino, Mark Levin and Ben Shapiro – directed its on-air personalities to stop spreading false information about the 2020 election being "stolen" or face termination.[404]

International reaction

Over 70 other countries and international organizations expressed their concerns over the protests and condemned the violence, with some specifically condemning Trump's own role in inciting the attack.[405][406] Multiple world leaders have made a call for peace, describing the riots as "an attack on democracy".[407] The leaders of Brazil, Mexico, Poland, Hungary and Russia declined to condemn the situation, and described it as an internal U.S. affair.[408]

Many media outlets worldwide described the storming as "anarchy", including British newspaper i and Canadian newspaper Ottawa Sun.[409][410]

Several NATO intelligence agencies outside the United States also briefed their governments that it was an attempted coup by President Trump which may have had help from federal law-enforcement officials.[411]

Of the various flags carried by the Trump supporters, an Indian flag was also prominently seen. It was held by a U.S. citizen of Indian origin hailing from Kochi in Southern India.[412] Varun Gandhi, a senior parliamentarian from India's ruling BJP, expressed surprise and disapproved the prominent display of the Indian flag by some of the protesters in one of his tweets. However, opposition Indian National Congress leader Shashi Tharoor equated the mentality of some Indians with that of Trump supporters.[413] Many Indians and U.S. citizens of Indian origin supported Trump as the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi endorsed Trump's candidacy during his famous speech during his visit to the U.S. in 2019.[414] Indian right-wing organizations like the Hindu Sena had performed special havans and pujas for Trump's electoral victory.[415]

Internationally, many world leaders criticized social media organizations for banning Donald Trump including Angela Merkel[416], Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Alexey Navalny, Ramzan Kadyrov[417], and Eduardo Bolsonaro.[418]

Aftermath

Criticism of the Capitol Police

Pro-Trump protesters around the Capitol on the evening of January 6

Law enforcement's failure to prevent the mob from breaching the Capitol attracted scrutiny to the Capitol Police and other police agencies involved.[419] The Capitol Police, which has jurisdiction over an area of around two square miles, is one of the largest and best-funded police forces in the United States, with around 2,000 officers, an annual budget of more than $460 million, access to a substantial arsenal, and extensive experience of responding to protests and high-profile events; it has more than tripled in size since 1996.[97] Prior to the storming of the Capitol, the barriers erected were low and most officers were in regular uniforms rather than riot gear, aimed at managing a protest rather than deterring an attack.[419] Policing experts criticized the Capitol Police's preparation and initial response, saying the agency had underestimated the potential threat from Trump supporters; unwisely allowed rioters to gather on the Capitol steps; and failed to immediately arrest the rioters, or otherwise respond to the disorder, after the forced entry.[419]

The Washington Post reported that the Capitol Police were caught off guard by an overwhelming crowd whose size more than doubled the FBI's prediction and that the police lacked enough personnel to immediately detain all the intruders; the Post further noted that "some officers were captured on video appearing to stand back as rioters streamed inside."[419][420] Some of the shortfall in staffing was attributable to the COVID-19 pandemic, with officers who were quarantined after being infected with or exposed to the COVID-19 virus.[419] Police units were not asked by management to bring protective equipment (such as gas masks) that were issued to them, which left officers ill prepared to fend off the rioters – among them, a "heavily trained group of militia terrorists" armed with bear spray and stun grenades and equipped with two-way radios and earpieces – and some having to resort to engaging in hand-to-hand combat to defend themselves.[226]

Footage emerged on social media of police allowing rioters through barricades into the Capitol, and one officer was filmed taking a "selfie" with a rioter inside the building.[421][422][423] Representative Jim Cooper (D, TN-5) was concerned that Capitol Police could have been complicit in the breach, saying "At worst, [Capitol Police] let this protest proceed unlike any other".[424] One participant in the riot said he and his friends had been gven directions to the office of Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer by a Capitol Police officer.[425][426] U.S. Representative Pramila Jayapal (D, WA-7) said she believed the rioters were aided in planning, and guided once inside the Capitol building, by Capitol Police officers.[426] Multiple European security officials, including two intelligence officials from NATO member countries, in interviews with Business Insider suggested the breach may have been abetted by "tacit support" of the attackers among members of Capitol Police and other federal agencies assisting with Capitol complex security.[411] Politico reported some rioters briefly showing their police badges or military identification to law enforcement as they approached the Capitol, expecting therefore to be let inside; a Capitol Police officer told BuzzFeed News that one rioter told him "[w]e're doing this for you" as he flashed a badge.[120] Ed Davis, the former commissioner of the Boston Police Department, suggested Capitol Police leaders may have felt "that well, these are a bunch of conservatives, they're not going to do anything like [the ensuing riot]", leading to "a lack of urgency or a sense that this could never happen with this crowd".[119]

Representative Zoe Lofgren, who chairs a committee responsible for Capitol security, said Capitol Police chief Steven Sund lied to her before the event about the preparations he had made and the readiness of the National Guard.[11] Representative Tim Ryan (D, OH-17), the chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch (which has budgetary authority over the Capitol Police), announced that he would begin an inquiry into security lapses that allowed the violent mob to overrun the Capitol and breach the legislative chambers. Ryan indicated that he expected some officers in the Capitol Police to be fired, and cited a "lack of professional planning and dealing" and "strategic mistakes" ahead of "the insurrection and the attempted coup".[427] U.S. Representative Anthony G. Brown (D, MD-4) called for the establishment of a civilian oversight board for the Capitol Police.[426]

On the January 7 edition of MSNBC's Morning Joe, host Joe Scarborough excoriated the Capitol Police response and accused some officers of enabling the rioters to successfully breach the building with little resistance, exclaiming that they "opened the fucking doors for them!"[369]

On January 8, the Senate Rules and Administration Committee and Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee launched a joint investigation into the Capitol Police's security failures.[428] The law enforcement failures that allowed the storming of the Capitol led the U.S. Secret Service to initiate a review of its security plans for the inauguration of Joe Biden on January 20, 2021.[419]

On January 11, Representative Ryan disclosed that two Capitol police officers had been suspended and at least ten were under investigation following the events of the riot.[429]

Accusations of differential treatment

Police officers before the storming

News outlets fact-checked[430] and described harsher tactics and differential treatment of racial injustice protests in D.C. during the prior summer by law enforcement compared to those used against the protesters who stormed the Capitol.[143][431][432][433] The Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia "arrested more than five times as many people at the height of the Black Lives Matter protests last summer" than during the 2021 Capitol protests.[434] Protesters who were arrested tended to be charged with less serious crimes than those arrested in racial injustice protests.[434][435]

The tone, vocabulary, and tactics used by Trump and the White House were highlighted by news outlets. Trump referred to racial injustice protesters as "thugs", "agitators", and "looters" and threatened violence,[436] but expressed his "love" for the Capitol protesters.[437] In 2020, Trump had encouraged states' governors to more aggressively target protesters and used violent rhetoric such as "when the looting starts, the shooting starts".[436] News outlets noted how the White House had used forceful tactics to clear protesters for Trump's photo op at St. John's Episcopal Church but did not employ similar tactics during the Capitol protest.[433][435][438] Similarly, Capitol Police responded aggressively to disabled protesters associated with ADAPT in 2017.[436] During 2020, Trump ordered tough federal law enforcement responses to racial injustice protesters in Washington DC.[430]

Multiple media outlets covered posts from users on social media which made claims that due to white privilege[436] and male privilege,[432] the police treated the protesters with more leniency than they would people of color or disabled individuals,[439] with many citing a moment when a police officer took a selfie with a protester.[440]

Many news outlets, including CNN,[441] USA Today,[442] The Guardian,[443] The Washington Post,[444] and CBS News,[445] criticized the police response to the storming of the Capitol in contrast to the police response to the Black Lives Matter protests in the previous year. In June 2020, during Black Lives Matter demonstrations, 5,000 National Guard members guarded the White House;[443] however, in an attempt to avoid inflaming tensions since those protests, Mayor Muriel Bowser opted not to call National Guard members from other states for the January 6 demonstrations, causing the law enforcement presence to be "relatively small" and "not prepared for rioters".[446][447]

Politicians and officials commented on the differential treatment as well. Joe Biden said, "No one can tell me that if it had been a group of Black Lives Matter protesting yesterday, there wouldn't have been – they would have been treated very, very differently than the mob of thugs that stormed the Capitol".[438] Representative Tim Ryan, former First Lady Michelle Obama, and D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine all noted the differential treatment.[438][427] Representative Bennie Thompson (D, MS-2), the chair of the House Committee on Homeland Security, said "if the 'protesters' were Black they would have been shot with rubber bullets, tear gassed, and killed".[426] Citing disparities in the use of force when compared to recent Black Lives Matter protests, first-year Representative Jamaal Bowman (D, NY-16) proposed legislation to investigate whether members of the Capitol Police have ties to white supremacist groups.[448]

Resignations

Ken Cuccinelli, acting Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security, touring the Capitol after the attack to survey damage

The day after the attack, Pelosi called upon Capitol Police chief Steven Sund to resign, citing a failure of leadership, and said she had been unable to reach Sund since the attack.[449] Sund announced his resignation that day, submitting a letter to the Capitol Police Board saying the resignation was effective January 16.[450][11][451] However, on January 8, Sund resigned with immediate effect.[451]

Also on the day after the attack, Paul D. Irving announced his resignation as Sergeant-at-Arms of the House of Representatives. Chuck Schumer said he would fire Michael C. Stenger, Sergeant-at-Arms of the Senate, upon becoming majority leader later in January.[11] Shortly thereafter, outgoing Majority Leader Mitch McConnell asked for and received Stenger's resignation, effective immediately.[11]

Criminal investigation and prosecutions

On January 7, Michael R. Sherwin, the interim United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, said rioters could be charged with seditious conspiracy or insurrection.[227] He said any Capitol Police officer found to have assisted the rioters would be charged,[144] and he further suggested that Trump could be investigated for comments he made to his supporters before they stormed the Capitol and that others who "assisted or facilitated or played some ancillary role" in the events could also be investigated.[227] The day after the storming of the Capitol, the FBI and D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department requested the public for assistance to identify any of the rioters.[452][453][454][455]

Also on January 7, House Homeland Security Committee Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson said that any rioter who entered the Capitol building should be added to the federal No-Fly List.[456] Former FBI director Andrew McCabe and David C. Williams argued Trump could face criminal charges for inciting the riot.[457]

A 34-year-old former Mormon missionary from Boise, Idaho was listed as a person of interest by the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia on January 8.[458][459][460] His social media (Facebook, Instagram and Twitter) were deleted following the riots, and he is currently seeking legal advice.[458]

On January 11, the New York State Bar Association (NYSBA) announced that it has launched an inquiry into Rudy Giuliani for his role in the uprising, which could subject him to expulsion from the association and recommendation for disbarment if he is held liable.[461]

Notable arrests and charges

On January 8, the Justice Department announced charges against 13 people in connection with the Capitol riot in federal district court; many more have been charged in the Superior Court of the District of Columbia.[462][463] Persons arrested included a 70-year-old resident of Falkville, Alabama, who allegedly parked a pickup truck two blocks from the Capitol containing eleven homemade incendiary devices (described as "Mason jars filled with homemade napalm" in court filings),[194] an M4 assault rifle, and a handgun.[464]

Another arrested rioter from Georgia allegedly brought a compact Tavor X95 assault rifle, two handguns, a "vial of injectable testosterone", and about 100 rounds of armor-piercing ammunition. He allegedly texted acquaintances that he was "gonna run that cunt Pelosi over while she chews on her gums" or "[put] a bullet in her noggin on [l]ive TV", adding that he "predict[s] that within 12 days, many in our country will die" and later texting a photo of himself in blackface.[194][464] He had previously protested outside of Georgia governor Brian Kemp's home.[194]

Two men seen carrying plastic handcuffs as they moved through the Capitol were arrested on January 10. The first man, who was wearing a tactical vest and a green combat helmet, had previously identified himself to The New Yorker. A 53-year-old retired Air Force lieutenant colonel from Grapevine, Texas, he claimed he "found the zip-tie handcuffs on the floor"; he was charged with one count of entering a restricted building and one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct. The second man, a 30-year-old pictured in a black cap and holding a fistful of zip ties as he jumped over railing in the Senate gallery, attended the riot with his mother. He told the Sunday Times the Capitol storming "was a kind of flexing of muscles" and that "the point of getting inside the building is to show them that we can, and we will." He was arrested in Tennessee and charged with the same crimes.[465]

A 60-year-old man from Gravette, Arkansas, who was photographed with his feet on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's desk during the storming of the Capitol, was arrested on January 8 on federal charges of entering and remaining on restricted grounds, violent entry, and theft of public property.[466][467][468][469] He will be extradited to DC to face trial.[462][470][471]

Another rioter, a 36-year-old father of five from Parrish, Florida, who was photographed carrying a lectern from Nancy Pelosi's office, was arrested on the night of January 8[472][473][474] and charged with entering a restricted building, stealing government property, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. The Miami Herald reported he had posted on social media comments that "disparaged the Black Lives Matter movement" and police "who defend First Amendment protected rights".[475]

Jake Angeli, also known as the "QAnon Shaman" and pictured in many widely-shared photos shirtless, wearing facepaint and a horned fur headdress, and carrying a spear, was arrested on January 9 and charged with one count of entering a restricted building and one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct.[462]

A man seen in video aggressively leading a mob up the stairs to the second floor of the Capitol was arrested by the FBI on January 9.[462] The leader of a Proud Boys group in Hawaii was taken into custody on January 7.[476]

Trump administration resignations

Matthew Pottinger, the Deputy National Security Advisor;[477] Stephanie Grisham, the chief of staff for First Lady Melania Trump; Sarah Matthews, the White House Deputy Press Secretary; and Anna Cristina "Rickie" Niceta Lloyd, the White House Social Secretary, resigned in protest on the day of the storming of the Capitol.[478][479][480] CNN reported that evening that several Trump aides were considering resigning, including Robert O'Brien and Chris Liddell.[481]

The next day, Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao became the first cabinet member to announce her resignation, effective January 11.[482] She was followed by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos, who also cited the Capitol Hill incident.[483] Mick Mulvaney, Trump's former chief of staff and the administration's special envoy to Northern Ireland; and Eric Dreiband, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division, announced their resignations as well.[362][484] Upon his exit, Mulvaney said, "I can't do it. I can't stay ... Those who choose to stay, and I have talked with some of them, are choosing to stay because they're worried the President might put someone worse in." He also said Trump "wasn't the same as he was eight months ago."[362] Five senior officials at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) resigned in protest.[485]

House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D, SC-6) and Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) criticized DeVos and Chao for resigning rather than voting to invoke the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office.[486]

Proposals to remove Trump via constitutional processes

Politicians

Representative Adam Kinzinger (Illinois's 16th district) became the first Republican lawmaker to call for Trump to be removed via 25th Amendment.[487]

The Democratic leaders in Congress – Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi – called upon Vice President Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment, indicating that they would pursue impeachment of Trump for a second time if he did not.[14][488] Pelosi said Trump "incited an armed insurrection against America" and instigated "the gleeful desecration of the U.S. Capitol [and] violence targeting Congress".[489] The never-before-invoked provision of the 25th Amendment allows the vice president, with a majority of Cabinet secretaries, to declare Trump "unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office" by written declaration.[490][491] On January 8, Pelosi also spoke to Mark Milley, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, about precautions to prevent Trump, who she described as "unhinged" and "unstable", from initiating military hostilities or accessing the Gold Codes to launch nuclear weapons.[492]

As of January 8, 199 representatives and 38 Senators have called for the invocation of the 25th Amendment or Trump's impeachment and removal from office in inciting the riot. All were Democrats (including two independent Senators who caucus with the Democrats, Angus King (ME) and Bernie Sanders (VT)), except for a sole Republican, Representative Adam Kinzinger.[493] Among Senate Republicans, only three have expressed support for removing Trump from office. Lisa Murkowski (AK) called for Trump to resign.[494] Ben Sasse said he would consider articles of impeachment from the House and that "the president has disregarded his oath of office."[495] Pat Toomey said he thought "the President committed impeachable offenses,"[496] and later called on Trump to resign.[497] President-elect Biden did not take a position on a prospective fast-track impeachment of Trump, saying the matter is for Congress to decide.[498] As of January 8, the number of Democratic representatives who supported Trump's removal either through impeachment or the 25th Amendment neared 200.[499][500]

Among Democratic governors, calls for Trump to step down or be removed from office were made by J. B. Pritzker (IL),[501][502] Andrew Cuomo (NY),[503] Roy Cooper (NC),[504] and Jay Inslee (WA).[505] Three Republican governors who have been critical of Trump – Phil Scott (VT), Charlie Baker (MA), and Larry Hogan (MD) – also called upon Trump to resign or be removed from office.[506] Conversely, two other Republican governors expressed opposition to Trump's removal: Henry McMaster (SC), who is closely allied with Trump,[507] and Mike DeWine (OH), who opposed invocation of the 25th Amendment, saying that he believed it "would cause more division than healing" and because there were less than two weeks remaining in Trump's term.[508]

Calls for Trump to be prosecuted for inciting the crowd to storm the Capitol also were made in the aftermath of the event.[509] D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser said, "We saw an unprecedented attack on our American democracy incited by the United States president. He must be held accountable. His constant and divisive rhetoric led to the abhorrent actions we saw today."[287]

Media and other organizations

Yoni Appelbaum of The Atlantic called for the impeachment of Trump a second time.[510] Several conservative commentators, including Rod Dreher, Daniel Larison, and John Podhoretz, expressed their support for the impeachment and removal of Trump.[511][512][513] The conservative editorial board of The Wall Street Journal wrote that Trump's behavior in the incident "crosses a constitutional line that Mr. Trump hasn't previously crossed. It is impeachable" and that the "best outcome would be for him to resign."[514] Calling the armed storming of the Capitol an "act of sedition", The Washington Post's editorial board wrote that Trump's "continued tenure in office poses a grave threat to U.S. democracy" as well as to public order and national security, and called for Pence to immediately begin the 25th Amendment process to declare Trump "unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office" so that Pence could serve until Biden's inauguration on January 20.[515]

The National Association of Manufacturers also requested Pence to "seriously consider" invoking the 25th Amendment.[516] On the evening of January 6, some Cabinet members held preliminary discussions about the possibility of invoking the 25th Amendment to declare Trump "unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office" and thus transfer his powers and duties to Pence as acting president.[517][518][519]

Pending impeachment proceedings

On January 11, House Democrats introduced a four-page Article of Impeachment against Trump for “inciting violence against the government of the United States” and encouraging his supporters to obstruct the Electoral College certification proceedings; it also cites his efforts to pressure Georgia Governor Brian Kemp, Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, and other state officials and lawmakers to overturn that state’s presidential election results. The article also seeks to permanently disqualify Trump—who has reportedly considered running for the Republican presidential nomination in 2024—from future elected office under Section 3 of the Fourteenth Amendment, which prohibits the election or appointment to a federal or state office of persons charged with engaging in insurrection, rebellion, or treason against the United States.[520]

In condemning Trump's actions pertaining to the insurrection and efforts to overturn the election, the article states:

"In all this, President Trump gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of government. He threatened the integrity of the democratic system, interfered with the peaceful transition of power, and imperiled a coequal branch of government.”

The House of Representatives is scheduled to vote on January 12 on a resolution formally calling on Vice President Pence to invoke Section 4 of the 25th Amendment to remove Trump and immediately assume powers as acting president until Biden is sworn into office on January 20. If Pence declines to invoke the amendment, debate on the impeachment resolution will begin on the morning of January 13, and a full vote of the House to consider the resolution will be held that evening.[521][522] If passed, unless Senate Majority Leader McConnell and Senate Minority Leader Schumer both agree to an emergency reconvening of the chamber, a trial will likely begin in the Senate as early as January 19.[521][523] As of January 8, the number of Democratic representatives who supported Trump's removal either through impeachment or the 25th Amendment neared 200.[499][524]

Potential spread of COVID-19

Public health experts have said that the storming of the Capitol was a potential COVID-19 superspreader event.[525] Few members of the crowd storming the Capitol wore face coverings, with many coming from out of town, and few of the rioters were immediately detained and identified.[525] First-year U.S. Representative Jacob LaTurner (R, KS-2) tested positive for COVID-19 after the lockdown was lifted on the evening of January 6, and, as a result, was absent from the House floor when the Electoral College certification resumed. As many as 200 congressional staffers reportedly sheltered in various rooms inside the Capitol, further increasing the risk of COVID-19 transmission.[525][526]

Brian P. Monahan, the attending physician of Congress, reported that members of Congress who "were in protective isolation in room located in a large committee hearing space" during the mob's attack, some for several hours, may have been exposed to others with SARS-CoV-2; Monahan advised members to take protective measures, monitor for symptoms, and take a precautionary PT-PCR test.[527][528] A video of members of Congress sheltering in place shows a group of maskless Republicans, including Andy Biggs, Scott Perry, Michael Cloud (R, TX-27) and Markwayne Mullin (R, OK-2), refusing masks offered by Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester (D-DE); Blunt Rochester later wrote that she was "disappointed in my colleagues who refused to wear a mask" but "encouraged by those who did."[527]

Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and lead member of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, said in an interview with WJLA-TV that the rioters "probably put themselves at an increased risk because they essentially did not adhere to the fundamentals of public health" to prevent the spread of COVID-19, such as "universal wearing of masks, keeping physical distance, [and] avoiding crowds in congregate settings."[529] The day after the storming of the Capitol, Eric Toner, a senior scholar from the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, said the storming of the Capitol was "extraordinarily dangerous" from a public-health perspective.[525]

American neo-Nazi and white supremacist activist Tim "Baked Alaska" Gionet participated in the day's events, including storming the Capitol, despite a recent COVID-19 diagnosis.[530]

On January 11, Representative Bonnie Watson Coleman (D, NJ-12) tested positive for COVID-19 from a rapid antigen test after being exposed to maskless personnel while sheltering during the storming of the Capitol Building. Watson Coleman, who had received the first dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, had mild symptoms and went into isolation while awaiting PCR testing results.[531]

Company crackdowns on conspiracies, incendiary content and Trump connections

The role of social media in the storming of the Capitol created pressure for platforms to strengthen enforcement of moderation policies prohibiting extremist content to prevent further violence. The response of social media platforms renewed accusations by some conservatives that their policies and enforcement promote an implicit ideological bias by limiting the expression of conservative political and social viewpoints even through controversial or false statements. The First Amendment, however, only restricts government-sanctioned limits on speech, and its protections do not apply to private entities and to obscene or defamatory speech.[532][533]

Suspensions of Trump's social media and severance of Trump connections

Shortly after Trump's January 6 video message was uploaded, the video was removed by Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube for violating site policies on "civil integrity" and election misinformation.[534] Facebook executive Guy Rosen said the video was removed because "it contributes to rather than diminishes the risk of ongoing violence."[535] That evening, Twitter locked Trump's account for twelve hours and threatened a permanent suspension for "repeated and severe violations of our Civic Integrity policy." Twitter also required him to remove three of his tweets.[536][537] Snapchat indefinitely suspended Trump's account on the platform the same day,[538] while Shopify terminated shops that sold Trump campaign paraphernalia and merchandise from his personal TrumpStore brand.[539]

The following day, Facebook and its platforms, including Instagram, announced they had banned Trump indefinitely, at least until the end of his presidential term. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote, "The shocking events of the last 24 hours clearly demonstrate that President Donald Trump intends to use his remaining time in office to undermine the peaceful and lawful transition of power to his elected successor."[540] On January 7, Twitch announced it had disabled Trump's channel on the platform.[541] TikTok – which Trump has unsuccessfully tried to ban in the U.S. on alleged national security concerns – announced it would restrict videos of the Capitol attack and Trump's January 6 address, other than those providing factual information, criticism or journalistic value under "counter speech" exceptions to its community guidelines, and redirect hashtags like #stormthecapitol and #patriotparty that were used by rioters and rally attendees to glorify the attack to reduce their discoverability.[542] Pinterest began limiting hashtags related to pro-Trump topics such as #StopTheSteal since around the November election.[543]

On January 8, Twitter permanently suspended Trump "due to the risk of further incitement of violence" from his tweets, citing the interpretable context of two posts from that day in which he claimed the approximately 75 million "great American Patriots" who voted for him in the 2020 election "will not be disrespected or treated unfairly in any way, shape or form!!!" and confirmed he would not attend Biden's January 20 inauguration.[13] The company noted it was aware that "plans for future armed protests [had] already begun proliferating on and off-Twitter, including a proposed secondary attack on the US Capitol and state capitol buildings on January 17, 2021" and that there were "multiple indicators that [Trump's recent tweets] are being received and understood as encouragement to do so." In addition to blocking his main account @realdonaldtrump, the ban applied to the official presidential account, @POTUS (which, because of its government-run status, was kept active as Twitter planned to transfer it to the incoming Biden administration), and his campaign's account, @TeamTrump, subjecting any subsequent posts to deletion; as well as to sock puppet accounts created specifically for him to evade the ban, which would be permanently suspended "at first detection."[544][545]

Circumventing the ban, Trump blasted Twitter's decision in threads posted on the latter two accounts that evening, accusing the platform without evidence of "coordinat[ing] with the Democrats and the Radical Left in removing [his main] account;" suggesting a "big announcement" of a new social platform intended for him and his supporters; and uploading an image of Twitter's bird logo emblazoned with the Soviet flag to decry perceived censorship of his speech. Twitter removed the thread post from @POTUS and suspended @TeamTrump entirely for repeated violations of its block evasion policy through both accounts;[545] it subsequently suspended the account of Trump campaign digital director Gary Coby, who, in an apparent attempt to let Trump to use it as a sock puppet, tried to forward his account information – attached with his unchanged eponym handle – to Deputy Chief of Staff Dan Scavino via tweet after Coby changed his avatar to a photo of Trump formerly used on the president's disabled main account and his account name to "Donald J. Trump."[545]

On January 10, the Professional Golfers' Association of America (PGA) rescinded its arrangement to host the 2022 PGA Championship at Trump National Golf Club Bedminster in Bedminster, New Jersey, which had been awarded in 2014, a year before Trump announced his candidacy.[546] In a video statement, PGA president Jim Richerson said, "It has become clear that conducting the PGA Championship at Trump Bedminster would be detrimental to the PGA of America brand". Trump had spent years trying to land a golf championship at one of his resorts.[547] The next day, the R&A followed suit; CEO Martin Slumbers said in a statement that the organization "had no plans to stage any of our championships at Turnberry and will not do so in the foreseeable future ... We will not return until we are convinced that the focus will be on the championship, the players and the course itself and we do not believe that is achievable in the current circumstances".[548] Also on January 10, Stripe announced it would stop processing online card payments to President Trump’s campaign for violating its terms of service against encouraging violence.[549]

Suspensions of other social media accounts

Twitter also banned accounts deemed to be "solely dedicated to sharing QAnon content," including those belonging to former national security adviser Michael Flynn and his son Michael Flynn Jr., attorneys Sidney Powell and L. Lin Wood (both of whom brought failed lawsuits challenging the election results), and former 8chan administrator Ron Watkins.[13][550] Using the aforementioned talking points about speech on social media long levied by conservatives, several allies and notable supporters of Trump – including son Donald Trump Jr.; congresspersons Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Lauren Boebert and Marjorie Taylor Greene (R, GA-14); Secretary of State Mike Pompeo; and former ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Hale – accused Twitter of free speech violations and perceived liberal bias for removing Trump and other prominent conservatives from the platform;[551][552][553] Russian pro-democracy leader Alexei Navalny called the ban an "unacceptable act of censorship" and noted that autocratic and kleptocratic political leaders such as Navalny adversary Vladimir Putin, Nicholas Maduro and Dmitry Medvedev remain on the platform despite being accused of committing extrajudicial killings, torture and corruption.[553]

Also on January 8, Discord banned a pro-Trump server called "The Donald", which had ties to the banned subreddit r/The Donald. Discord cited the connection between the server and The Donald's online forum, which was used in planning the riot.[554] Parler removed several posts from Wood espousing conspiracy theories and violent rhetoric, including a call for Vice President Pence and others to be subjected to firing squads, for violating community rules on speech encouraging violence.[555] YouTube terminated two accounts belonging to former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon, including one hosting his "War Room" podcast, for repeated community guidelines violations pertaining to misinformation about widespread fraud or errors that affected the 2020 election's outcome.[556]

Denial of service to platforms

Parler, a Twitter-emulating microblogging platform, found notoriety following the event.[557] The platform—which rose to prominence following Joe Biden's projected win of the 2020 election—advertises itself as an uncensored, non-biased free-speech service and attracted primarily right-wing individuals, particularly those who were restricted from or were fearful of having their accounts suspended by other platforms.[558][559] On January 8, following Trump's permanent ban from Twitter, Parler downloads on the Apple App Store increased 281% over the day prior (210,000 vs. 55,000 on January 7), jumping it from #18 to #1 on app's download charts[557] alongside prominent right-wing politicians advertising their Parler accounts.[560]

The same day, Apple and Google took action against Parler, citing complaints the platform allowed the planning and coordination of the insurrection:[561][562] Apple sent notice to Parler ownership that its iOS and iPadOS apps would be removed from the App Store within a day unless Parler implemented a more robust content moderation policy;[562] Google removed the app from the Google Play Store, citing "continued posting in the Parler app that seeks to incite ongoing violence in the US".[561] Apple followed suit, removing the platform on January 9, saying Parler's moderation procedures toward violence-inciting speech were insufficient.[563]

Following pressure from activist group Amazon Employees for Climate Justice,[564] on January 9, Amazon Web Services announced it would terminate cloud server access to Parler effective the following evening;[565] as a result, Parler suspended service at 11:59 p.m. PST on January 10.[566] Amazon said it had sent reports of 98 instances, along with screenshots provided of several examples, of posts that "clearly encourage and incite violence" to Parler in the weeks preceding the decision.[567] After Amazon took it offline, Parler CEO John Matze was adamant the site would continue, saying "What Parler will look like a month from now, I can't tell you, but Parler will not be gone."[568]

Right-wing figures strongly criticized the measures as authoritarian and anti-free speech. U.S. Representative Devin Nunes (R, CA-22) claimed "Republicans have no way to communicate". Political commentator Lou Dobbs claimed Parler had grounds for an antitrust lawsuit.[568] On January 11, Parler filed an antitrust and breach of contract lawsuit against Amazon Web Services with the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington, seeking a temporary restraining order forcing the company to restore server hosting services to Parler.[569]

Security measures

Following the storming of the Capitol and increased incidents of harassment, members of Congress will receive additional security as they travel through airports. Additionally, as precautions following the storming, the Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, Baltimore-Washington International Airport, and Dulles International Airport will receive security from the Capitol Police during Inauguration Day.[570]

Following the storming, security was heightened at the Capitol. A "non-scalable" security fence was placed around the Capitol and 6,200 members of the National Guard were deployed to the national capital region.[12] The National Guard units assigned to the capital will have access to lethal force through January 20.[571]

Due to calls of further protests and violence in Washington, D.C., and states across the U.S., the FBI and state law enforcement agencies began conducting threat assessments and tracking online rhetoric in preparation.[572]

Up to 15,000 National Guard members will be deployed in time for Inauguration Day.[573]

CNN reported on January 11 that an internal FBI bulletin warned that "Armed protests are being planned at all 50 state capitols from 16 January through at least 20 January, and at the US Capitol from 17 January through 20 January," continuing, "an identified group calling for others to join them in 'storming' state, local and federal government courthouses and administrative buildings in the event POTUS is removed as President prior to Inauguration Day. This identified group is also planning to 'storm' government offices including in the District of Columbia and in every state, regardless of whether the states certified electoral votes for Biden or Trump, on 20 January."[574][114][575]

Events outside Washington, D.C.

State capitols

Multiple U.S. state capitols closed for safety reasons after the storming of the U.S. Capitol.[576][577] Several states also experienced protests and riots.

Eleven people were arrested in Sacramento, California, for illegal possession of pepper spray. No injuries were reported, but there was at least one reported assault. Several roads were closed in downtown Sacramento and some bus lines were stopped, with over 200 police assigned to the demonstration. Some members of the crowd wore t-shirts supporting the far-right Proud Boys.[578][579] Militia members in Georgia also attempted to storm the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta, leading to the evacuation of Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and other officials.[580] By about 3:15 p.m on January 6, 2021, it was reported that the majority of the demonstration had disbanded outside of the Georgia Capitol.[581] Protests took place inside the Kansas State Capitol.[582] A Capitol police officer said protesters were allowed in the rotunda, as they had a permit to protest there.[583][584]

Trump supporters and police at the Texas State Capitol on January 6

A peaceful "Storm the Capitol" rally in St. Paul, Minnesota, was met by about 30 Minnesota State Patrol troopers and did not breach the state capitol. Demonstrators then marched to the governor's residence.[585] The protesters cheered upon learning that rioters in Washington had entered the U.S. Capitol.[586] Protesters in Lincoln, Nebraska, gathered outside the state capitol during the opening of the new session of the Nebraska Legislature.[587] Protesters and counter-protesters demonstrated at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio. One brief violent incident was reported.[588] The Oklahoma State Capitol in Oklahoma City was the site of another protest. One arrest was made on charges of attempted arson as well as assault and battery for attempting to light other people's flags on fire.[589] The protest numbered in the hundreds and was otherwise peaceful.[590] There were also arrests in Salem after hundreds gathered outside the Oregon State Capitol.[591][592][593] A crowd also formed in Carson City, Nevada.[594] In Indianapolis, approximately 100 people, including many members of the Proud Boys, gathered at the Indiana Statehouse; the Indiana crowd was peaceful.[595]

Two Tennessee lawmakers held a prayer rally at Legislative Plaza in Nashville. The crowd numbered roughly 150.[596][597] Protesters in Olympia, Washington, some of whom were armed, made their way onto the front lawn of the Washington Governor's Mansion at the Washington State Capitol Campus.[598][599]

The FBI has issued a bulletin warning of armed protests at all 50 state capitols before the Inauguration of President Joseph R. Biden.[600] The DHS secretary has moved the preparations for Continuity of Government Operations forward one week to Wednesday January 13, 2021. The National Guard has plans for 10,000 troops in Washington DC by Saturday January 16, 2021, with 5000 additional troops in reserve.[600]

Other U.S. cities

Several hundred protesters gathered outside the Ahern Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The protest extended onto Las Vegas Boulevard as protesters marched to the Lloyd D. George Federal Courthouse.[601][602] There were also protests in the Los Angeles area, including at the Los Angeles Police Department headquarters downtown; as well as in Beverly Hills and in Newport Beach. An incident was reported of a protester spraying a counter-protester with a chemical irritant.[603] During the Los Angeles protests, a mob of 30 to 40 Trump supporters physically assaulted a black woman who was walking down the street, shouting racial slurs and chanting "All Lives Matter" while shoving, striking, spraying with pepper spray, and ripping off her hair extensions.[604][605][606]

International

Internationally, Trump's allegations of a "stolen" election found a small audience among conspiracy theorists and fringe groups.[607] In Canada, a few dozen people rallied in support of Trump in Toronto, Vancouver, and Calgary.[608] At the Vancouver rally, CBC photojournalist Ben Nelms was assaulted by one of the demonstrators.[609][610][611] In Japan, a few hundred people rallied in support of Trump in Tokyo, with several people carrying the U.S. flag and the Rising Sun Flag, a controversial symbol in East Asia due to its association with Japanese imperialism. The gathering in Tokyo was backed by Happy Science, a new religious movement that has been described as a cult, and took place several hours before the rally in Washington, D.C.[607]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Stunning Images as a Mob Storms the U.S. Capitol". The New York Times. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  2. ^ a b Lakritz, Talia (January 6, 2021). "Shocking photos show pro-Trump rioters in the Capitol stealing memorabilia and breaking into the desks of lawmakers". Yahoo News. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c Benner, Katie; Levenson, Michael (January 8, 2021). "A Capitol Police officer who was seriously injured Wednesday remains on life support". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  4. ^ Massimo, Rick; Vitka, Will. "Trump condemns Capitol riot; DeVos, US Capitol Police chief to resign". WTOP. Today, First Amendment protests turned violent. Many persons came to the District armed and for the purpose of engaging in violence and destruction and have engaged in violence and destruction. They have fired chemical irritants, bricks, bottles, and guns.
  5. ^
  6. ^ a b c Date, Jack; Barr, Luke (January 7, 2021). "'Hazardous' suspected explosive devices found outside RNC and DNC". ABC News. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  7. ^ a b "What happened in Washington DC yesterday? A timeline of insurrection". The Independent. January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  8. ^ Miller, Maggie; The Hill: "Laptop stolen from Pelosi's office during Capitol riots" 2021 January 8 [1] Retrieved 2021 January 11.
  9. ^ "Top White House officials resign after Capitol Hill riots, including Melania Trump's chief of staff". www.abc.net.au. January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  10. ^ "The Trump Administration Officials Who Resigned Over the Violence in the Capitol". The New York Times. January 9, 2021. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  11. ^ a b c d e Everett, Burgess; Caygle, Heather (January 7, 2021). "Top Dems sack Capitol security officials after deadly riot". Politico. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  12. ^ a b c Katkov, Mark (January 7, 2021). "Army Sec. Says A 'Non-Scalable' 7-Foot Fence Is Going Up Around U.S. Capitol". NPR. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  13. ^ a b c "Twitter permanently suspends Trump from its platform, citing 'risk of further incitement of violence'". KWWL. Associated Press. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  14. ^ a b Pramuk, Jacob (January 7, 2021). "Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer calls for Trump's immediate removal from office". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  15. ^ Kutlu, Ovunc. "Death toll rises to 5 at Capitol riots in US capital". Anadolu Agency.
  16. ^ "Capitol secured after assault from Trump supporters". CBS News. January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  17. ^
  18. ^ a b Dartunorro, Clark; Thorp V, Frank (January 8, 2021). "Capitol Police officer dies from injuries after clashing with pro-Trump mob". NBC News. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  19. ^ a b kaplan, Michael (January 11, 2021). "Morale deteriorates among Capitol police after assault on Capitol". CBS News. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  20. ^ Melendez, Pilar; Bredderman, William; Montgomery, Blake (January 6, 2021). "Woman Shot Dead as Mob Overran Capitol ID'ed as Air Force Vet". The Daily Beast. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  21. ^ Raju, Manu; Barrett, Ted (January 7, 2021). "Facing criticism, US Capitol Police details response to mob, 14 suspects arrested and 50 officers injured". CNN. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  22. ^ Thrush, Glenn; Dewan, Shaila; Eligon, John; MacFarquhar, Neil (January 7, 2021). "Questions mount over law enforcement's failure to protect the Capitol". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Mr. Sund said more than 50 Capitol Police and Washington Metro Police officers had been injured, and several Capitol Police officers were hospitalized with serious injuries.
  23. ^ Perez, Evan; Herb, Jeremy; Polantz, Katelyn; Scannell, Kara; Carrega, Christina (January 7, 2021). "Prosecutors 'looking at all actors,' including Trump, as charges are filed against Capitol rioters". CNN. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  24. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (January 11, 2021). "At least 25 domestic terrorism cases opened after US Capitol breach". CNN. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  25. ^ Associated Press (January 11, 2021). "Capitol assault a more sinister attack than first appeared". Associated Press. Retrieved January 12, 2021. Under battle flags bearing Donald Trump's name, the Capitol's attackers pinned a bloodied police officer in a doorway, his twisted face and screams captured on video. They mortally wounded another officer with a blunt weapon and body-slammed a third over a railing into the crowd. 'Hang Mike Pence!' the insurrectionists chanted as they pressed inside, beating police with pipes. They demanded House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's whereabouts, too. They hunted any and all lawmakers: 'Where are they?' Outside, makeshift gallows stood, complete with sturdy wooden steps and the noose. Guns and pipe bombs had been stashed in the vicinity. ... The mob got stirring encouragement from Trump and more explicit marching orders from the president’s men. 'Fight like hell,' Trump exhorted his partisans at the staging rally. 'Let's have trial by combat,' implored his lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, whose attempt to throw out election results in trial by courtroom failed. It's time to 'start taking down names and kicking ass,' said Republican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama. Criminals pardoned by Trump, among them Roger Stone and Michael Flynn, came forward at rallies on the eve of the attack to tell the crowds they were fighting a battle between good and evil.
  26. ^ Steve Doig, "It is difficult, if not impossible, to estimate the size of the crowd", The Conversation, Jan. 8, 2021.
  27. ^ a b c d e Leonnig, Carol D.; Davis, Aaron C.; Hermann, Peter; Demirjian, Karoun (January 10, 2021). "Outgoing Capitol Police chief: House, Senate security officials hamstrung efforts to call in National Guard". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  28. ^ Barrett, Ted; Raju, Manu; Nickeas, Peter. "Pro-Trump mob storms US Capitol as armed standoff takes place outside House chamber". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  29. ^ "Trump supporters storm Capitol; DC National Guard activated; woman fatally shot". The Washington Post. January 7, 2021.
  30. ^ Thomas Pallini (January 7, 2021). "Photos show the aftermath of an unprecedented and destructive siege on the US Capitol that left 4 rioters dead". Business Insider.
  31. ^ Daly, Matthew; Balsamo, Michael (January 8, 2021). "Deadly siege focuses attention on Capitol Police". Associated Press. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  32. ^ *Landale, James (January 7, 2021). "Capitol siege: Trump's words 'directly led' to violence, Patel says". BBC News. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  33. ^ Dozier, Kimberly; Bergengruen, Vera (January 6, 2021). "Incited by the President, Trump Supporters Violently Storm the Capitol". Time. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  34. ^ a b c "This is what Trump told supporters before many stormed Capitol Hill". ABC News. Retrieved January 10, 2021. We have come to demand that Congress do the right thing and only count the electors who have been lawfully slated. Lawfully slated. I know that everyone here will soon be marching over to the Capitol building to peacefully and patriotically make your voices heard. Today, we will see whether Republicans stand strong for integrity of our elections. But whether or not they stand strong for our country, our country. Our country has been under siege for a long time. Far longer than this four year period.
  35. ^ "Capitol Riot Death Toll Rises to 5; Police Hunt for Suspects". NBC4 Washington. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  36. ^ "Capitol attack: the five people who died". the Guardian. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  37. ^ Barry, Dan; Frenkel, Sheera (January 7, 2021). "'Be There. Will Be Wild!': Trump All but Circled the Date". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  38. ^ Higgins, Andrew (January 10, 2021). "The Art of the Lie? The Bigger the Better – Lying as a political tool is hardly new. But a readiness, even enthusiasm, to be deceived has become a driving force in politics around the world, most recently in the United States". The New York Times. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  39. ^ Amenabar, Teddy; Zauzmer, Julie; Davies, Emily; Brice-Saddler, Michael; Ruane, Michael E.; et al. (January 6, 2021). "Live updates: Hundreds storm Capitol barricades; two nearby buildings briefly evacuated; Trump falsely tells thousands he won". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  40. ^ Peñaloza, Marisa (January 6, 2021). "Trump Supporters Clash With Capitol Police At Protest". NPR. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  41. ^ Rodd, Scott; Hooks, Kris. "Trump Supporters, Proud Boys Converge On California's Capitol To Protest Electoral College Count". CapRadio. KXJZ. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  42. ^ Faulders, Katherine; Santucci, John (January 5, 2021). "As he seeks to prevent certification of election, Trump plans to attend DC rally". ABC News. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  43. ^ Holmes, Anisa (January 6, 2021). "Trump Supporters Gather, President Incites Chaos in DC". WRC-TV. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  44. ^ President Donald Trump, ABC News Prime: Call for Trump's removal, Capitol Hill security failure, Global reaction to riots on YouTube, ABC News, January 8, 2021, minutes 10:55–11:06.
  45. ^ McCarthy, Tom; Ho, Vivian; Greve, Joan E. (January 7, 2021). "Schumer calls pro-Trump mob 'domestic terrorists' as Senate resumes election certification – live". The Guardian. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  46. ^ a b Andersen, Travis (January 6, 2021). "Before mob stormed US Capitol, Trump told them to 'fight like hell' –". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  47. ^ Blake, Aaron (January 7, 2021). "'Let's have trial by combat': How Trump and allies egged on the violent scenes Wednesday". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  48. ^ "Trump Told Crowd 'You Will Never Take Back Our Country With Weakness'". The New York Times. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  49. ^ "'Reckless' and 'stupid': Trump Jr calls for 'total war' over election results". The Independent. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  50. ^ "Must-See New Video Shows Capitol Riot Was Way Worse Than We Thought". www.youtube.com. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  51. ^ Colvin, Jill (January 9, 2021). "Capitol mob built gallows and chanted 'Hang Mike Pence'". Associated Press. Archived from the original on January 10, 2021.
  52. ^ "US Capitol rioters chanted 'Hang Mike Pence' – video footage". www.timesofisrael.com.
  53. ^ Sheth, Sonam. "A Reuters photographer says he overheard pro-Trump insurrectionists saying they wanted to hang Mike Pence at the Capitol". Business Insider.
  54. ^ a b Turner-Cohen, Alex (January 11, 2021). "US Capitol riot mob wanted to kill Mike Pence, run Pelosi over with a car". News.com.au. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  55. ^ a b "Watch Live: Protesters Swarm US Capitol Steps as Congress Counts Electoral Votes". NBC4 Washington. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  56. ^ Macias, Amanda; Mangan, Dan (January 6, 2021). "U.S. Capitol secured hours after pro-Trump rioters invade Congress". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  57. ^ a b c McEvoy, Jemima (January 6, 2021). "DC Protests Live Coverage: Entire Capitol Now On Lockdown As Protesters Enter The Building". Forbes. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  58. ^ a b Lang, Brent; Littleton, Cynthia (January 6, 2021). "U.S. Capitol on Lockdown, Pro-Trump Protestors Breach Police Lines". Variety. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  59. ^ Conradis, Brandon (January 6, 2021). "Pelosi's office vandalized after pro-Trump rioters storm Capitol". TheHill. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  60. ^ Swaine, Jon. "Man who posed at Pelosi desk said in Facebook post that he is prepared for violent death". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  61. ^ Rambaran, Vandana. "Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley says laptop stolen from office during Capitol riots". Fox News. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  62. ^ Higgins, Tucker (January 6, 2021). "DC protests: FBI says 2 suspicious devices were rendered safe". CNBC Politics. CNBC.
  63. ^ Benner, Katie (January 6, 2021). "Pipe Bomb Found and Destroyed at R.N.C.; D.N.C. Is Evacuated - The New York Times". The New York Times. The New York Times Company.
  64. ^ Evelyn, Kenya (January 9, 2021). "Capitol attack: the five people who died". The Guardian. The Guardian.
  65. ^ Collins; Cohen, Zachary; Starr, Barbara; Hansler, Jennifer (January 7, 2021). "Pence took lead as Trump initially resisted sending National Guard to Capitol". CNN. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  66. ^ a b Zilbermints, Regina (January 6, 2021). "Trump tells rioters 'go home,' repeats claims that election 'fraudulent'". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  67. ^ a b Durkee, Alison (January 6, 2021). "Trump Justifies Supporters Storming Capitol: 'These Are The Things And Events That Happen'". Forbes. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  68. ^ Liptak, Kevin; Stracqualursi, Veronica; Malloy, Allie (January 7, 2021). "Isolated Trump reluctantly pledges 'orderly' transition after inciting mob". CNN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021.
  69. ^ Fordham, Evie (January 7, 2021). "Trump promises 'orderly transition' on Jan. 20 after Electoral College results certified". Fox News. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  70. ^ Elbaum, Rachel (January 7, 2021). "Trump commits to 'orderly transition' in statement after mob storms Capitol". NBC. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  71. ^ a b Sherman, Gabriel (January 8, 2021). "'HE KNEW HE F – KED UP': FACING LEGAL AND POLITICAL PERIL, TRUMP IS TURNING ON EVEN HIS MOST DEVOTED ALLIES". Vanity Fair. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  72. ^ a b Broadwater, Luke; Fandos, Nicholas; Haberman, Maggie (January 9, 2021). "Democrats Ready Impeachment Charge Against Trump for Inciting Capitol Mob". The New York Times. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  73. ^ Pramuk, Jacob (January 7, 2021). "Pelosi and Schumer call for Trump's immediate removal from office for 'insurrection'". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  74. ^ Karni, Annie; Haberman, Maggie (January 6, 2021). "Trump openly condones supporters who violently stormed the Capitol, prompting Twitter to lock his account". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  75. ^ Business, Brian Fung, CNN. "Twitter bans President Trump permanently". CNN. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  76. ^ *Larson, Carlton (January 7, 2021). "The framers would have seen the mob at the Capitol as traitors". Washington Post. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  77. ^
  78. ^ Call, Charles T. (January 8, 2021). "No, it's not a coup – It's a failed 'self-coup' that will undermine US leadership and democracy worldwide". Brookings Institution. Retrieved January 9, 2021. Trump's measures to overturn the elections since November 3 constitute a 'coup,' as they involve illegal usurpation of state power, even when it may not involve the use of force. Yet it is a 'self'-coup because it is perpetrated by the head of government rather than military officers or others against that chief executive.
  79. ^ Sources that refer to the event as a coup include:
  80. ^ a b Coleman, Justine (January 6, 2021). "GOP lawmaker on violence at Capitol: 'This is a coup attempt'". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  81. ^ "Poll: One-Fifth of Voters, Almost Half of Republicans, Agree with Storming of US Capitol". NEWS10 ABC Albany. January 8, 2021.
  82. ^ a b Amanda Holpuch (January 6, 2021). "US Capitol's last breach was more than 200 years ago". The Guardian. For the first time on Wednesday, it was the site of an armed insurrection incited by the sitting president....Not since 1814 has the building been breached. Then, it was by British troops who set fire to the building during a broader attack on Washington in the war of 1812.
  83. ^ Jason Puckett & Terry Spry Jr. (January 6, 2021). "Has the US Capitol ever been attacked before?". Tegna Inc. VERIFY – via WXIA-TV. While this is the first large-scale occupation of the U.S. Capitol since 1814, there have been several other instances of violence at the U.S. Capitol, particularly in the 20th century.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  84. ^ Marc Fisher, Meagan Flynn, Jessica Contrera & Carol D. Loennig (January 7, 2021). "The four-hour insurrection: How a Trump mob halted American democracy". Washington Post. The attack, which some historians called the most severe assault on the Capitol since the British sacked the building in 1814CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  85. ^ Ted Barrett, Manu Raju & Peter Nickeas (January 6, 2020). "US Capitol secured, 4 dead after rioters stormed the halls of Congress to block Biden's win". CNN. The stunning display of insurrection was the first time the US Capitol had been overrun since the British attacked and burned the building in August of 1814, during the War of 1812, according to Samuel Holliday, director of scholarship and operations with the US Capitol Historical Society.
  86. ^ "Biden officially secures enough electors to become president". AP NEWS. December 5, 2020.
  87. ^ a b Multiple sources:
  88. ^ a b c Nickeas, Peter (January 6, 2021). "Pro-Trump supporters have flooded DC to protest president's election loss". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  89. ^ "Read Pence's full letter saying he can't claim "unilateral authority" to reject electoral votes". PBS News Hour. Associated Press. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  90. ^ Carless, Will (January 4, 2021). "Nation's capital braces for violence as extremist groups converge to protest Trump's election loss". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 5, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  91. ^ a b "'We're gonna kill Congress': Trump's far-right supporters promise violence at today's DC protests". The Raw Story. January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  92. ^ a b c d Schwartz, Brian (January 9, 2021). "Pro-Trump dark money groups organized the rally that led to deadly Capitol Hill riot". CNBC. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  93. ^ Montini, EJ (January 10, 2020). "Arizona Reps. Andy Biggs and Paul Gosar implicated by activist in Capitol insurrection". azcentral.com. The Arizona Republic. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  94. ^ Rob Kuznia; Curt Devine; Scott Bronstein; Bob Ortega. "Extremists intensify calls for violence ahead of Inauguration Day". CNN.
  95. ^ Sommer, Will (January 11, 2021). "'Stop the Steal' Organizer in Hiding After Denying Blame for Riot" – via www.thedailybeast.com.
  96. ^ Robert Anglen; Ronald J. Hansen. "Reps. Paul Gosar, Andy Biggs credited in video with organizing Trump crowd in DC on day of riot". The Arizona Republic.
  97. ^ a b c Graff, Garrett M. (January 8, 2021). "Behind the Strategic Failure of the Capitol Police". Politico. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  98. ^ Lytvyenko, Jane; Hensley-Clancy, Molly (January 6, 2021). "The Rioters Who Took Over The Capitol Have Been Planning Online In The Open For Weeks". BuzzFeed News. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  99. ^ Frenkel, Sheera (January 6, 2021). "The storming of Capitol Hill was organized on social media". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  100. ^ "Proud Boys and neo-Nazis: Who are the protesters who stormed the US Capitol?". The Daily Telegraph. January 8, 2021.
  101. ^ Frenkel, Sheera (January 6, 2021). "The storming of Capitol Hill was organized on social media". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  102. ^ McEvoy, Jemima (January 7, 2021). "Capitol Attack Was Planned Openly Online For Weeks – Police Still Weren't Ready". Forbes. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  103. ^ Graziosi, Graig (January 8, 2021). "Alex Jones says he paid $500,000 for rally that led to Capitol riot". The Independent.
  104. ^ Thalen, Mikael (January 9, 2021). "Charlie Kirk deletes tweet saying he sent '80+ buses full of patriots' to D.C." The Daily Dot.
  105. ^ Mayer, Jane (December 21, 2017). "A Conservative Nonprofit That Seeks to Transform College Campuses Faces Allegations of Racial Bias and Illegal Campaign Activity". New Yorker. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  106. ^ "Advisory Council". Turning Point USA. Archived from the original on November 1, 2018. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  107. ^ Teduardo (January 9, 2021). "Ginni Thomas - Aiding & Abetting the Capitol Insurrection". Daily Kos. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  108. ^ Joseph Stern, Mark (January 8, 2020). "Ginni Thomas, Wife of Clarence, Cheered On the Rally That Turned Into the Capitol Riot". Slate. Retrieved January 11, 2020.
  109. ^ "Did Clarence Thomas' Wife Ginni Sponsor 80 Buses to Capitol Riots?". Snopes.com.
  110. ^ Barry, Dan; McIntire, Mike; Rosenberg, Matthew (January 9, 2021). "'Our President Wants Us Here': The Mob That Stormed the Capitol". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  111. ^ Wong, Venessa (January 8, 2021). "Trump Supporters Used GoFundMe To "Build An Army" In DC". BuzzFeed News. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  112. ^ a b c d Kuznia, Rob; Devine, Curt; Bronstein, Scott; Ortega, Bob (January 8, 2021). "Extremists intensify calls for violence ahead of Inauguration Day". CNN. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  113. ^ "The Man Who Saw Yesterday's Coup Attempt Coming Is Only Surprised It Wasn't Much Worse". GQ. Condé Nast.
  114. ^ a b Long, Colleen; Balsamo, Michael; Kunzelman, Michael (January 11, 2021). "FBI warns of plans for nationwide armed protests next week". Associated Press. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  115. ^ "Extremists and Mainstream Trump Supporters Plan to Protest Congressional Certification of Biden's Victory". Anti-Defamation League. January 4, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  116. ^ "January 2021 Washington, D.C., Security Outlook: Intelligence Report, Part Three". G4S. January 4, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  117. ^ Marquardt, Alex; Starr, Barbara; Main, Alison; Cole, Devan. "Pentagon approves DC mayor's request to deploy National Guard for upcoming demonstrations". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  118. ^ Dilanian, Ken; Tom Winter, Jonathan Dienst and Andrew Blankstein (January 10, 2021). "FBI, NYPD told Capitol Police about risk of violence, officials say". NBC News. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  119. ^ a b c Long, Colleen; Baldor, Lolita; Balsamo, Michael; Merchant, Nomaan (January 7, 2021). "Capitol Police rejected offers of federal help to quell mob". Associated Press.
  120. ^ a b c d e Bertrand, Natasha (January 7, 2021). "Justice Department warns of national security fallout from Capitol Hill insurrection". Politico. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  121. ^ "Capitol police were overrun, 'left naked' against rioters". Associated Press. January 10, 2021. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  122. ^ Shabad, Rebecca (January 6, 2021). "Trump to address D.C. rally where as many as 30,000 people are expected". NBC News. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  123. ^ Ramirez, Stephanie (January 5, 2021). "Several arrested on gun charges as pro-Trump rallies begin in DC". FOX 5 DC. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  124. ^ Palma, Bethania (January 6, 2021). "Did Rudy Giuliani Call for 'Trial By Combat' Before Trump Mob Broke Into Capitol?". Snopes. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  125. ^ "Chapman Faces Pressure to Fire Professor Who Spoke at Trump Rally | Inside Higher Ed". www.insidehighered.com. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  126. ^ Gattis, Paul (January 6, 2021). "Mo Brooks: Today patriots start 'kicking ass' in fighting vote results". AL.com. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  127. ^ Pellicer, Lauren (January 6, 2021). "NC Congressional Delegates React To Violence As Pro-Trump Mob Storms US Capitol". Blue Ridge Public Radio.
  128. ^ Haberman, Maggie (January 6, 2021). "Trump, speaking to protesters, declares 'we will never concede.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  129. ^ Savage, Charlie (January 10, 2021). "Incitement to Riot? What Trump Told Supporters Before Mob Stormed Capitol". The New York Times. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  130. ^ *Liptak, Kevin; Stracqualursi, Veronica; Malloy, Allie (January 7, 2021). "Trump publicly acknowledges he won't serve a second term a day after inciting mob". CNN. Trump, who has repeatedly refused to concede the election, on Wednesday egged on his supporters who would later breach the US Capitol in an attempt to stop lawmakers from counting the electoral votes cast in the 2020 presidential election. ... After a speech filled with lies and misrepresentations that incensed the crowd, Trump returned to the White House to watch a violent crescendo to his constant spreading of misinformation about the electoral process
    • Morris, David Z. (January 7, 2021). "'We will never concede': How Donald Trump incited an attack on America". Fortune. At the rally, Trump delivered the same inflammatory rhetoric and false claims that have characterized his entire presidency. For most of an hour, he reiterated claims that the election had been stolen – claims which have been rejected as unfounded by at least 59 courts, including many headed by Trump-appointed judges....Trump also repeatedly intimated that his followers should take action. Near the beginning of his speech, Trump even made what appeared to be an indirect threat to Vice President Mike Pence, who, Trump incorrectly told his supporters, had the power to overturn the Nov. 3 election results....As the speech continued, Trump edged ever closer to calling for direct action by his supporters.
    • Rucker, Philip (January 6, 2021). "Trump's presidency finishes in 'American carnage' as rioters storm the Capitol". The Washington Post. Trump made a fiery last stand and incited his supporters to storm and sack the U.S. Capitol as part of an attempted coup...At the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue, meanwhile, Trump addressed his rally crowd at the Ellipse, with the White House as his grand backdrop. He began with a lie, declaring that there were hundreds of thousands of people there; attendance was far smaller. Then another: 'They rigged an election, they rigged it like they've never rigged an election before. ... We won it by a landslide. This was not a close election.' In fact, Biden won with 306 electoral college votes to Trump's 232. Biden also won the popular vote by 7 million votes, or a 4.5 percentage point margin. As he concocted his fantasy about the election, ticking through one baseless or debunked claim of fraud after another, Trump vowed, 'We will never concede.'
  131. ^ Graziosi, Graig (January 6, 2021). "Trump's sons declare war on GOP". The Independent. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  132. ^ Bernard, Katie (January 7, 2021). "A photographer and a fist pump. The story behind the image that will haunt Josh Hawley". The Kansas City Star. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  133. ^ Regnier, Chris (January 7, 2021). "Senator Hawley criticized for acknowledging Capitol protesters with fist pump". KTVI. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021.
  134. ^ Wingrove, Josh; Natter, Ari; House, Billy (January 6, 2021). "Pro-Trump Mob Driven From Capitol After Breach, Fatal Shooting". Bloomberg News. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  135. ^ Doig, Steve (January 8, 2021). "It is difficult, if not impossible, to estimate the size of the crowd that stormed Capitol Hill". The Conversation. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  136. ^ "US Capitol secured, 4 dead after rioters stormed the halls of Congress to block Biden's win". CNN. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  137. ^ Lee, Jessica. "Did Trump Watch Capitol Riots From a Private Party Nearby?". Snopes. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  138. ^ Greenberg, Jon; Kim, Noah Y. (January 8, 2021). "Black Lives Matter protests and the Capitol assault: Comparing the police response". PolitiFact. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  139. ^ Smith, Harrison; Olivo, Antonio (January 6, 2021). "Rioters use ropes, makeshift ladders to invade Capitol". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021.
  140. ^ a b c d e f Demirjian, Karoun; Leonnig, Carol D.; Kane, Paul; Davis, Aaron C. (January 9, 2021). "Inside the Capitol siege: How barricaded lawmakers and aides sounded urgent pleas for help as police lost control". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  141. ^ Balsamo, Michael; Long, Colleen (January 6, 2021). "The Latest: Schumer says Jan. 6, 2021, will live in infamy". Associated Press. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021.
  142. ^ "Woman dies after shooting in U.S. Capitol; D.C. National Guard activated after mob breaches building". The Washington Post. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. A mob was able to breach security and successfully enter the building
  143. ^ a b Smith, Jamil (January 7, 2021). "White Entitlement, On Parade". Rolling Stone. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  144. ^ a b Landay, Jonathan; Zengerle, Patricia; Morgan, David (January 7, 2021). "'Failure at the top:' After U.S. Capitol stormed, security chiefs out". Reuters. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  145. ^ McLaughlin, Eliott C. (January 7, 2021). "Before Wednesday, insurgents waving Confederate flags hadn't been within 6 miles of the US Capitol". CNN. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021.
  146. ^ Contreras, Russell. "Descendant of Robert E. Lee says Confederate flag at Capitol was "treasonous"". Axios.
  147. ^ Anderson, Javonte. "Capitol riot images showing Confederate flag a reminder of country's darkest past". USA Today.
  148. ^ Tumlin, Remy (January 6, 2021). "Evening Briefing Special Edition: A Pro-Trump Mob Storms the Capitol". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  149. ^ Fitz-Gibbon, Jorge (January 7, 2021). "Neo-Nazis among protesters who stormed US Capitol".
  150. ^ Eddy, Melissa (January 8, 2021). "Amid the Rampage at the U.S. Capitol, a Sweatshirt Stirs Troubling Memories" – via NYTimes.com.
  151. ^ Curt Devine; Scott Bronstein. "Man in 'Camp Auschwitz' sweatshirt during Capitol riot identified". CNN.
  152. ^ Cramer, Maria (January 9, 2021). "Confederate Battle Flag in the Capitol: A 'Jarring' First in U.S. History". The New York Times. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  153. ^ Sidney Blumenthal (January 9, 2021). "Trump's Maga insurrectionists were perverse US civil war re-enactors". The Guardian. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  154. ^ Before Wednesday, insurgents waving Confederate flags hadn't been within 6 miles of the US Capitol
  155. ^ "Senate rejects challenge to Biden Arizona win". PBS. Associated Press. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  156. ^ a b "LIVE COVERAGE: Congress certifies Biden win after Pennsylvania, Arizona challenges fail". The Hill. Capitol Hill Publishing Corp. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  157. ^ "Sen. Lankford interrupted while speaking before Senate as rioters enter Capitol". Tulsa World. January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  158. ^ Williams, Michael; Mishanec, Nora; Li, Roland; Fracassa, Dominic (January 6, 2021). "Live updates: Twitter says users discussing second attack on U.S. Capitol on Jan. 17". Laredo Morning Times. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  159. ^ Nicholas Fandos; Erin Schaff; Emily Cochrane (January 7, 2021). "'Senate Being Locked Down': Inside a Harrowing Day at the Capitol". The New York Times.
  160. ^ Fandos, Nicholas; Cochrane, Emily; Sullivan, Eileen; Thrush, Glenn; Kanno-Youngs, Zolan (January 6, 2021). "Pence and lawmakers evacuated as protesters storm the Capitol, halting Congress's counting of electoral votes". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  161. ^ a b Kanno-Youngs, Zolan; Tavernise, Sabrina; Cochrane, Emily (January 7, 2021). "As House Was Breached, a Fear 'We'd Have to Fight' to Get Out". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  162. ^ "The Photos of These Women Saving the Ballot Boxes Belong in History Books". Yahoo Finance. Yahoo Finance. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  163. ^ "Senate salvages Electoral College ballots before rioters break into the chamber". CNBC. CNBC. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  164. ^ Frenkel, Sheera (January 8, 2021). "The storming of Capitol Hill was organized on social media". The New York Times. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  165. ^ Fisher, Marc; Flynn, Meagan; Contrera, Jessica; Leonnig, Carol D. (January 8, 2021). "The four-hour insurrection". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  166. ^ Barbaro, Michael (January 8, 2021). "How They Stormed Congress". The Daily (New York Times podcast). ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  167. ^ Colvin, Jill (January 8, 2021). "Hurt feelings, anger linger after Pence, Trump clash". ABC News. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  168. ^ "'Hang Mike Pence!' Trump supporters intended to execute vice president during Capitol riots". The Raw Story. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  169. ^ "Hurt feelings, anger linger after Pence, Trump clash". ABC News. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  170. ^ Sheth, Sonam (January 8, 2021). "A Reuters photographer says he overheard pro-Trump insurrectionists saying they wanted to hang Mike Pence at the Capitol". Business Insider. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  171. ^ a b Morris, Seren (January 7, 2021). "Video of Senate Office Ransacked in Capitol Chaos Viewed Over 5 Million Times". Newsweek. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  172. ^ a b Kane, Paul (January 6, 2021). "Inside the assault on the Capitol: Evacuating the Senate". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  173. ^ "Associated Press Timeline of events at the Capitol, 4 dead". My Sun Coast. Associated Press. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  174. ^ Kois, Dan (January 8, 2021). "They Were Out for Blood". Slate. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  175. ^ Acosta, Jim (January 7, 2021). "Trump pressured Pence to engineer a coup, then put the VP in danger, source says". CNN.
  176. ^ a b c Fandos, Nicholas; Schaff, Erin; Cochrane, Emily (January 8, 2021). "'Senate Being Locked Down': Inside a Harrowing Day at the Capitol". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  177. ^ a b Wire, Sarah D. (January 6, 2021). "Reporter inside Capitol describes being in a roomful of people 'panicked that I might inadvertently give away their location'". The Seattle Times. Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  178. ^ "Watch the moment House floor forced into recess as protesters enter Capitol". MSN. The Washington Post. January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  179. ^ Hensley-Clancy, Molly; Nashrulla, Tasneem; Baird, Addy; Jamieson, Amber; Namako, Tom; Hall, Ellie; McLeod, Paul; Baer, Stephanie K. (January 6, 2021). "Trump Launched A Deadly Attempted Coup, Encouraging A Mob To Breach The US Capitol Building Because He Lost The Presidential Election". BuzzFeed News. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  180. ^ a b c d Swaine, Jon; Bennett, Dalton; Sohyun Lee, Joyce; Kelly, Meg (January 8, 2021). "Video shows fatal shooting of Ashli Babbitt in the Capitol". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  181. ^ a b Berge, Clint (January 6, 2021). "HAPPENING NOW: Armed standoff inside US Capitol, shots fired". WQOW. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  182. ^ a b "Violent pro-Trump mob storms US Capitol". BBC News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  183. ^ Chowdhury, Maureen (January 6, 2021). "Lawmaker says staff were able to remove electoral ballots before rioters breached Senate floor". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021.
  184. ^ Winsor, Morgan; Pereira, Ivan; Mansell, William (January 7, 2021). "Updates: Capitol breached by protesters, shots reported fired inside". ABC News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  185. ^ "Police draw guns inside the Capitol". The New York Times. January 6, 2021. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  186. ^ a b "Trump supporters storm U.S. Capitol, with one woman killed and tear gas fired". The Washington Post. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  187. ^ "Nancy Pelosi's Office Occupied by Pro-Trump Rioters amid Chaos at U.S. Capitol". People. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  188. ^ Lee, Timothy B. (January 6, 2021). "Pro-Trump reporter gloats over access to fleeing Hill staffer's computer". Ars Technica. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  189. ^ "Arkansas man admits to storming Capitol, sitting at Nancy Pelosi's desk". thv11.com. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  190. ^ a b Benner, Katie; Haberman, Maggie; Schmidt, Michael S. (January 6, 2021). "Live Updates: Pro-Trump Mob Breaches Capitol, Halting Vote Certification". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  191. ^ a b Schaff, Erin; Tavernise, Sabrina (January 6, 2021). "Marauding protesters vandalize Speaker Pelosi's office". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  192. ^ *Neilson, Susie; McFall-Johnsen, Morgan (January 6, 2021). "Several groups of extremists stormed the Capitol on Wednesday. Here are some of the most notable individuals, symbols, and groups". The Business Insider. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  193. ^ Makuch, Ben (January 7, 2021). "Neo-Nazis Boast About Participation In Capitol Hill Invasion". Vice. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  194. ^ a b c d Biesecker, Michael; Kunzelman, Michael; Flaccus, Gillian; Mustian, Jim (January 10, 2021). "Records show fervent Trump fans fueled US Capitol takeover". AP News. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  195. ^ "CNN's Elle Reeve: 'Donald Trump plus the Internet brings extremism to the masses'". www.weny.com.
  196. ^ Dil, Cuneyt (January 7, 2021). "Local lawmakers from several states joined, observed riot at US Capitol". Charleston, W.Va.: WWL-TV. Associated Press. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  197. ^ Haas, Greg (January 8, 2021). "Democrats call for Nevada Republican Annie Black to resign Assembly seat". 8 News Now. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  198. ^ "After 'traitor' tweet, Maryland state Del. Cox denounces 'mob violence' at Capitol". WTOP. January 10, 2021. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  199. ^ Buchanan, Joe. "W.Va. Delegate Derrick Evans has been federally charged". WDTV. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  200. ^ McElhinny, Brad (January 9, 2021). "Derrick Evans resigns W.Va. House after entering U.S. Capitol with mob". West Virginia MetroNews.
  201. ^ Vanden Brook, Tom (January 10, 2021). "At least 25 people under investigation for terrorism in connection with Capitol riot". USA Today. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  202. ^ Bellware, Kim (January 9, 2021). "Police departments across the U.S. open probes into whether their own members took part in the Capitol riot". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  203. ^ Stelloh, Tim; Moe, Alex; Talbot, Haley (January 11, 2021). "2 Capitol police officers suspended, 1 possibly arrested over pro-Trump riot, congressman says". NBC News. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  204. ^ Nickeas, Peter; Grayer, Annie; Nobles, Ryan (January 12, 2021). "2 Capitol Police officers suspended and 10-15 more under investigation for alleged roles in riot". CNN. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  205. ^ a b Balsamo, Michael (January 11, 2021). "Discovery of pipe bombs in DC obscured by riot at Capitol". The Seattle Times. Retrieved January 11, 2021 – via The Seattle Times.
  206. ^ a b Sanchez, Rosa (January 7, 2021). "FBI posts photo of person who placed suspected pipe bombs outside DNC, RNC". ABC News. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  207. ^ Benner, Katie; Haberman, Maggie; Schmidt, Michael S. (January 6, 2021). "An explosive device is found at the R.N.C., and the D.N.C. is evacuated". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  208. ^ Barrett, Devlin; Dawsey, Josh (January 6, 2021). "Suspected homemade bombs found near RNC and DNC headquarters". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  209. ^ "DC Police Chief: Two pipe bombs, cooler with Molotov cocktails found on Capitol grounds". KMGH. January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  210. ^ Diaz, Jaclyn; Chappell, Bill; Moore, Elena (January 7, 2021). "Police Confirm Death Of Officer Injured During Attack On Capitol". NPR. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  211. ^ Porter, Tom (January 8, 2021). "Trump supporter arrested at Capitol had 11 Molotov cocktails: Feds". Business Insider. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  212. ^ "Alabama man arrested during Capitol riots had Molotov cocktails in mason jars, police say". WVTM 13. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  213. ^ "DC Mayor Issues 6 p.m. Curfew Following Protests Wednesday". CBS Baltimore. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  214. ^ "The Latest: Armed police clear out rioters, Capitol complex 'secured'". 8News. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  215. ^ "Gov. Northam issues State of Emergency, institutes curfew in Alexandria, Arlington". WFXR-TV. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021.
  216. ^ Sonne, Paul; Hermann, Peter; Ryan, Missy (January 7, 2021). "Pentagon placed limits on D.C. Guard ahead of pro-Trump protests due to narrow mission". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  217. ^ Witte, Brian (January 8, 2021). "Gov. Hogan Describes Delayed Permission to Send Maryland National Guard". WRC-TV.
  218. ^ a b c Cooper, Helene (January 6, 2021). "Army activates D.C. National Guard to deploy troops to the Capitol". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  219. ^ Schmitt, Eric (January 6, 2021). "The entire D.C. National Guard has been mobilized". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  220. ^ McCarthy, Tom; Ho, Vivian; Greve, Joan E (January 6, 2021). "Trump supporters storm Capitol as McConnell warns of democracy 'death spiral'". The Guardian. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  221. ^ Julia, Ainsley; De Luce, Dan; Gains, Mosheh (January 8, 2021). "Pentagon, D.C. officials point fingers at each other over Capitol riot response". NBC News. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  222. ^ Walsh, Joe. "Reports: Trump Resisted Sending National Guard To Quell Violent Mob At U.S. Capitol". Forbes. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  223. ^ Haberman, Maggie; Cooper, Helene (January 7, 2021). "Trump rebuffed initial requests to deploy the National Guard to the Capitol. Pence gave the go-ahead". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  224. ^ Williamson, Jeff (January 6, 2021). "Gov. Northam sending Virginia National Guard and 200 state troopers to Washington, DC". WSLS. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  225. ^ a b c Wilson, Kristin; Barrett, Ted; Raju, Manu; Zaslav, Ali; Fortinsky, Sarah (January 6, 2021). "Smoke grenades being deployed on Senate side of the US Capitol". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021.
  226. ^ a b Emmanuel Felton (January 9, 2021). "These Black Capitol Police Officers Describe Fighting Off "Racist Ass Terrorists"". Buzzfeed News.
  227. ^ a b c Borger, Julian (January 8, 2021). "Democratic leaders call for Trump's removal from office". The Guardian. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  228. ^ Barnes, Julian E.; Mazzetti, Mark (January 6, 2021). "F.B.I. and Homeland Security make a show of force in Washington". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021.
  229. ^ "New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy Deploys State Police To Washington, D.C. After Violent Protesters Storm U.S. Capitol". Philadelphia: KYW-TV. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  230. ^ Perez, Evan (January 6, 2021). "Congressional leaders are being evacuated from Capitol complex". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021.
  231. ^ Pramuk, Jacob (January 6, 2021). "National Guard will head to the Capitol to tamp down pro-Trump insurrection". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  232. ^ "Maryland Troopers Heading To DC To Help Quell Unrest At US Capitol, Hogan Says". CBS Local. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  233. ^ Solender, Andrew (January 7, 2021). "Maryland Governor Says Pentagon 'Repeatedly Denied' Approval To Send National Guard To Capitol". Forbes. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  234. ^ Wilson, Kristin (January 6, 2021). "US Capitol building is now secure, Sergeant-at-Arms says". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021.
  235. ^ Benveniste, Alexis (January 10, 2021). "Capitol rioter to CNN: We could absolutely f***ing destroy you". CNN. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  236. ^ Steinhauer, Jennifer (January 6, 2021). "Police in Washington seize 5 guns and arrest at least 13 during violent Capitol protest". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  237. ^ "After Chaos, Insurrection And Death, Pro-Trump Rioters Defy D.C. Curfew". NPR. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  238. ^ "Gov. Cuomo: Capital riots a 'failed attempt at a coup,' NY National Guard sent to DC". RochesterFirst. Albany, N.Y. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  239. ^ Levenson, Michael (January 7, 2021). "Washington, D.C. mayor issues order extending emergency for 15 days". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  240. ^ Bowser, Muriel (January 6, 2021), Mayor's Order 2021-003 (PDF), archived (PDF) from the original on January 7, 2021, retrieved January 7, 2021
  241. ^ "Roll Call Vote 117th Congress – 1st Session: On the Objection (Shall the Objection Submitted by the Gentleman from Arizona, Mr. Gosar, and the Senator from Texas, Mr. Cruz, and Others Be Sustained? )". senate.gov. United States Senate. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  242. ^ "FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 10". clerk.house.gov. Library of Congress. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  243. ^ Mitchell, Tia (January 7, 2011). "Loeffler withdraws support for challenge, Congress accepts Biden win in Georgia". Atlanta Journal Constitution. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  244. ^ "The Latest: Trump promises 'orderly transition' on Jan. 20". Associated Press. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  245. ^ "Roll Call Vote 117th Congress – 1st Session: On the Objection (Shall the Objection Submitted by the Gentleman from Pennsylvania, Mr. Perry, and the Senator from Missouri, Mr. Hawley, Be Sustained? )". senate.gov. United States Senate. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  246. ^ "FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 11". clerk.house.gov. Library of Congress. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  247. ^ Welch, Matt (January 8, 2021). "Amash's Successor Peter Meijer: Trump's Deceptions Are 'Rankly Unfit' – Reason.com". Reason. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  248. ^ Meijer, Peter (January 9, 2021). "Rep. Meijer: I experienced the heinous assault on Capitol; now, time to face reality". Detroit News. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  249. ^ "Capitol attack: Congress certifies Joe Biden's victory after deadly violence". BBC News. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  250. ^ King, Ledyard; Groppe, Maureen; Wu, Nicholas; Jansen, Bart; Subramanian, Courtney; Garrison, Joey (January 6, 2021). "Pence confirms Biden as winner, officially ending electoral count after day of violence at Capitol". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  251. ^ "Live Updates: Joe Biden Is Certified as the 46th President of the United States". The New York Times. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  252. ^ Wagner, Meg; et al. (January 7, 2021). "Congress finalizes Biden's win after riot disrupts Capitol". CNN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  253. ^ a b c d "Loss of USCP Officer Brian D. Sicknick" (Press release). Washington, D.C.: United States Capitol Police. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021. At approximately 9:30 p.m. this evening (January 7, 2021), United States Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick passed away due to injuries sustained while on-duty. Officer Sicknick was responding to the riots on Wednesday, January 6, 2021, at the U.S. Capitol and was injured while physically engaging with protesters. He returned to his division office and collapsed. He was taken to a local hospital where he succumbed to his injuries. The death of Officer Sicknick will be investigated by the Metropolitan Police Department's Homicide Branch, the USCP, and our federal partners. Officer Sicknick joined the USCP in July 2008, and most recently served in the Department's First Responder's Unit.
  254. ^ Safdar, Khadeeja; Ailworth, Erin; Seetharaman, Deepa (January 8, 2021). "Police Identify Five Dead After Capitol Riot". The Wall Street Journal.
  255. ^ Conley-Kendzior, Lisa (January 7, 2021). "Capitol Police say reports of officer's death are wrong". The Hill.
  256. ^ Limon, Alexandra (January 8, 2021). "Capitol Police were hit in the head with lead pipes". fox8.com. Nexstar. Retrieved January 12, 2020 – via WJW.
  257. ^ Hauck, Grace; Subramanian, Courtney; Diamond, Michael L.; Loyer, Susan (January 8, 2021). "Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick who Died After Pro-Trump Riot was Veteran and War Critic". USA Today.
  258. ^ "Trump to blame for death of woman trampled in Capitol riot, family member says". Reuters. January 8, 2021.
  259. ^ a b Haberman, Maggie; Schmidt, Michael S. (January 9, 2021). "Trump has not lowered flags in honor of an officer who died from injuries sustained amid the riot". The New York Times. Retrieved January 9, 2021. While the flags at the Capitol have been lowered, Mr. Trump has not issued a similar order for federal buildings under his control. ... Mr. Trump has not reached out to Mr. Sicknick's family, although Vice President Mike Pence called to offer condolences, an aide to Mr. Pence said.
  260. ^ Elis, Niv (January 8, 2021). "Pelosi orders flags at half-staff for Capitol officer who died". The Hill. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  261. ^ Haberman, Maggie (January 10, 2021). "After refusing to do so, Trump orders flags to be flown at half-staff". The New York Times. Retrieved January 10, 2021. Despite widespread criticism, Mr. Trump had refused to lower the flags, but relented on January 10.
  262. ^ CNN, Jeremy Diamond and Paul LeBlanc. "White House orders flags lowered to honor late police officers who responded to US Capitol breach". CNN. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  263. ^ "White House advisers: Trump has no intention of resigning". KOBI-TV. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  264. ^ "Father of slain Capitol officer hopes son's death brings end to 'lunacy'". NBC News.
  265. ^ Rolli, Bryan (January 8, 2021). "After Capitol police officer dies, #TedCruzKilledACop trends over Cruz inciting rioters". The Daily Dot. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  266. ^ a b Jouvenal, Justin; Leonnig, Carol (January 8, 2021). "Ashli Babbitt was shot during chaotic moments in the Capitol". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  267. ^ Wagner, Dennis; Daniels, Melissa; Hauck, Grace (January 7, 2021). "California woman killed during Capitol riot was a military veteran and staunch Trump supporter". USA Today. Babbitt served in the Air Force under the married name of Ashli Elizabeth McEntee.
  268. ^ a b "Capitol riots: A visual guide to the storming of Congress". BBC News. January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  269. ^ Kates, Graham (January 7, 2021). "Ashli Babbitt identified as woman killed by police during U.S. Capitol riots". CBS News. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  270. ^ "KUSI News confirms identity of woman shot and killed inside US Capitol". KUSI-TV. January 6, 2021.
  271. ^ Barry, Ellen; Bogel-Burroughs, Nicholas; Philipps, Dave (January 8, 2021). "Woman Killed in Capitol Embraced Trump and QAnon". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  272. ^ Porter, Tom (January 7, 2021). "QAnon supporters believed marching on the Capitol could trigger 'The Storm,' an event where they hope Trump's foes will be punished in mass executions". Business Insider. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  273. ^ Zadrozny, Brandy; Gains, Mosheh (January 7, 2021). "Woman killed in Capitol was Trump supporter who embraced conspiracy theories". NBC News. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  274. ^ Tan, Rebecca; Thompson, Steve; Olivo, Antonio (January 8, 2021). "Few details so far about deaths of 'medical emergency' victims in rioting at Capitol". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  275. ^ Mascaro, Lisa; Tucker, Eric; Jalonick, Mary Clare; Taylor, Andrew (January 7, 2021). "4 dead as Trump supporters stormed US Capitol". WESH. Associated Press. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  276. ^ Freiman, Jordan (January 7, 2021). "4 dead after Trump supporters storm U.S. Capitol". CBS News. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  277. ^ "Trump to blame for death of woman trampled in Capitol riot, family member says". Reuters. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  278. ^ Taylor, Pilar Melendez,Ana Lucia Murillo,Will Lennon,Matt (January 7, 2021). "MAGA Mob Kills Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick, Iraq War Veteran Defending Congress From Trump Rioters" – via thedailybeast.com.
  279. ^ a b Thanawala, Sudhin; Dazio, Stefanie; Martin, Jeff (January 9, 2021). "Family: Trump supporter who died followed QAnon conspiracy". Associated Press. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  280. ^ Thanawala, Sudhin; Dazio, Stefanie; Martin, Jeff; Press, Associated (January 9, 2021). "'It cost her her life': Trump supporter who died from apparent trampling in US Capitol riots followed QAnon, family says". 6abc Philadelphia. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  281. ^ a b Kesslen, Ben (January 7, 2021). "Trump supporters who died during Capitol riot left online presence". NBC News. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  282. ^ "Ashli Babbitt: The US veteran shot dead breaking into the Capitol". BBC News. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  283. ^ Terruso, Julia. "He organized a bus of Trump supporters from Pa. for 'the first day of the rest of our lives.' He died in D.C." Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  284. ^ "Founder of site Trumparoo among dead at Capitol". WPIX. Associated Press. January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  285. ^ Watkins, Mea; Packer, Meghan; Youngbauer, Rhiannon (January 7, 2021). "Kennesaw woman among people who died at D.C. riot". CBS 46 News. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  286. ^ Ruger, Todd (January 6, 2021). "Calls for impeachment, prosecution of president after pro-Trump mob storms Capitol". Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  287. ^ a b Doherty, Ben (January 7, 2021). "Woman shot and killed in storming of US Capitol named as Ashli Babbitt". The Guardian. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021.
  288. ^ Nanos, Elura (January 7, 2021). "Could the Capitol Rioters Really Be Charged with Felony Murder for Death of Ashli Babbitt?". Law & Crime.
  289. ^ Fandos, Nicholas; Broadwater, Luke (January 10, 2021). "Police Officer Who Responded to Capitol Riot Dies Off Duty". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  290. ^ "Vice president Mike Pence 'not ruling out' 25th amendment to oust Donald Trump". Metro. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  291. ^ Sommerfeldt, Chris (January 7, 2021). "Pro-Trump rioters smeared poop in U.S. Capitol hallways during belligerent attack". Daily News. New York.
  292. ^ a b c Bahr, Sarah (January 7, 2021). "Curators Scour Capitol for Damage to the Building or Its Art".
  293. ^ a b Barlyn,Suzanne (January 7, 2021). "U.S. taxpayers to pay Capitol siege tab as government shuns insurance".
  294. ^ "Mob swarms media outside Capitol, damages equipment". NBC News. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  295. ^ *Burdyk, Zack (January 7, 2021). "Hoyer says rioters destroyed display commemorating John Lewis". The Hill.
  296. ^ Wang, Claire (January 8, 2021). "Behind the viral photo of Rep. Andy Kim cleaning up at midnight after riots". Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  297. ^ a b c Sarah Bahr (January 8, 2021). "First Inventory of Damage to U.S. Capitol Building Released". New York Times.
  298. ^ a b Castronuovo, Celine (January 9, 2021). "Flags, signs and other items left behind in Capitol riot to be preserved as historical artifacts". TheHill. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  299. ^ Wagner, Meg; Macaya, Melissa (January 8, 2021). "Clyburn's spokesperson tells CNN they found his iPad, was not taken by rioters". CNN. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  300. ^ a b Miller, Maggie (January 8, 2021). "Laptop stolen from Pelosi's office during Capitol riots". The Hill. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  301. ^ Black, John; Sotak, J. W.; Spoonts, Sean (January 8, 2021). "Computers with Access to Classified Material Stolen from Capitol". SOFREP. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  302. ^ "News & Notices | Architect of the Capitol". www.aoc.gov. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  303. ^ Krazit, Tom (January 7, 2021). "Don't worry about the cybersecurity fallout of the Capitol breach". Protocol. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  304. ^ Matthew Mosk; Josh Margolin; James Gordon Meek; Alexander Mallin (January 8, 2021). "Investigators combing through massive US Capitol crime scene in wake of pro-Trump riot". ABC News.
  305. ^ Harm Venhuizen (January 9, 2021). "Insurrectionist 'Zip-Tie Guy' identified as retired Air Force lieutenant colonel". Military Times.
  306. ^ Jeff Schogol (January 10, 2021). "The Capitol Hill insurrection reveals veterans are at war against themselves: Veterans vs. veterans". Task and Purpose.
  307. ^ Edmondson, Catie (January 6, 2021). "Live Updates: Pro-Trump Protesters Storm the Capitol". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  308. ^ Baker, Peter; Haberman, Maggie (January 8, 2021). "Capitol Attack Leads Democrats to Demand That Trump Leave Office". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  309. ^ Olivia Nuzzi (January 8, 2021). "Senior Trump Official: We Were Wrong, He's a 'Fascist'". New York. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  310. ^ Lonas, Lexi (January 8, 2021). "Sasse says Trump was 'delighted' and 'excited' by reports of Capitol riot". The Hill.
  311. ^ Bob Brigham (January 6, 2021). "Trump is 'fuming mad' after unsuccessful insurrection – aide says he has 'lost it': reports". Raw Story. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  312. ^ Gabriel Sherman (January 7, 2021). ""They're Being Told to Stay Away from Trump": After a Day of Violence and 25th Amendment Chatter, Trump's Allies are Jumping Ship". Vanity Fair. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  313. ^ a b Serfaty, Sunlen; Cole, Devan; Rogers, Alex (January 8, 2021). "As riot raged at Capitol, Trump tried to call senators to overturn election". CNN. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  314. ^ a b c d e f g h Associated Press Timeline of events at the Capitol, 4 dead, Associated Press (January 6, 2021).
  315. ^ Gearan, Anne; Dawsey, Josh (January 7, 2021). "Trump issued a call to arms. Then he urged his followers 'to remember this day forever!'". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  316. ^ "Trump encourages his supporters to 'remember this day.'". The New York Times. January 6, 2021. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  317. ^ Boggs, Justin (January 7, 2021). "Joe Biden's win in the Electoral College confirmed, President Trump concedes he is leaving office". The Denver Channel. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  318. ^ Jack Durschlag (January 8, 2021). "Trump calls for healing, smooth transition after 'heinous attack' on Capitol". FOX News. Archived from the original on January 9, 2021.
  319. ^ Choi, Matthew. "Trump condemns violence in Capitol riots, more than 24 hours later". Politico. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  320. ^ Choi, Matthew. "McEnany tries to distance administration from Capitol riots". Politico. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  321. ^ Nguyen, Tina (January 8, 2021). "'Coward': MAGA internet turns on Trump". Politico. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  322. ^ "Violence engulfs US Capitol as Trump supporters run riot". BBC News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  323. ^ "Violent pro-Trump mob storms US Capitol". BBC News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  324. ^ "Pence to Rioters: 'You Did Not Win'". NBC4 Washington. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  325. ^ Welker, Kristin; O'Donnell, Kelly; Alba, Monica (January 9, 2021). "Pence to attend Biden inauguration; Trump never called him in the Capitol bunker, sources say". NBC News. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  326. ^ Frenkel, Sheera (January 6, 2021). "The storming of Capitol Hill was organized on social media". The New York Times. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  327. ^ Acosta, Jim (January 7, 2021). "Trump pressured Pence to engineer a coup, then put the VP in danger, source says". CNN. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  328. ^ Acosta, Jim; Brown, Pamela (January 7, 2021). "Trump pressured Pence to engineer a coup, then put the VP in danger, source says". CNN. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  329. ^ "'Our Democracy Is Under Unprecedented Assault,' Biden Says". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  330. ^ "Watch live: Biden is speaking amid violence at Capitol – The Boston Globe". The Boston Globe. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  331. ^ "President-elect Biden Delivers Remarks in Wilmington, Delaware". C-SPAN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  332. ^ Shear, Michael D. (January 6, 2021). "Biden calls on Trump to go on national television and 'demand an end to this siege.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  333. ^ Melimopoulos, Elizabeth. "Biden calls Capitol rioters 'domestic terrorists'". Al Jazeera. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  334. ^ @KamalaHarris (January 6, 2021). "I join President-elect @JoeBiden in calling for the assault on the Capitol and our nation's public servants to end" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  335. ^ "Congress will reconvene to certify Biden's Electoral College win". Politico. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  336. ^ "Rioters breach Capitol as Congress certifies Biden's win". CNN. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  337. ^ "'Domestic terrorists': Schumer condemns pro-Trump mob's storming of Capitol – video". The Guardian. Associated Press. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  338. ^ Weisman, Jonathan (January 6, 2021). "Pelosi: The electoral vote tally will resume once the Capitol is cleared". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  339. ^ Trump presidency and Capitol siege: What is the 25th Amendment? BBC
  340. ^ Benchaabane, Nassim (January 6, 2021). "Rep. Cori Bush calls for expulsion of House Republicans who sought to overturn election". STLtoday.com. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021.
  341. ^ Johnson, Marty (January 6, 2021). "Cori Bush introduces legislation to sanction, remove all House members who supported election challenges". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  342. ^ Coleman, Justine (January 6, 2021). "Liz Cheney blames Trump for riots: 'He lit the flame'". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  343. ^ Forgey, Quint. "GOP Rep. Mace: Trump's legacy 'wiped out' by Capitol riot". Politico. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  344. ^ Castronuovo, Celine (January 6, 2021). "GOP lawmaker on protesters storming Capitol: 'I have not seen anything like this since I deployed to Iraq'". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  345. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (January 6, 2021). "GOP congresswoman to no longer challenge Biden's win after US Capitol breach". CNN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  346. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (January 6, 2021). "US Capitol breach prompts host of GOP lawmakers to decide against challenging Biden's win". CNN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  347. ^ Kelly, Caroline; Robertson, Nicky (January 6, 2021). "Romney: 'What happened here today was an insurrection, incited by the President'". CNN. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  348. ^ Itkowitz, Colby; Firozi, Paulina (January 6, 2021). "Democrats, Republicans blame Trump for inciting 'coup' as mob storms Capitol". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  349. ^ Carney, Jordain (January 7, 2021). "GOP senators blame Trump after mob overruns Capitol". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  350. ^ Dennis, Steven T.; Dillard, Jarrell (January 6, 2021). "Republicans Recoil From Trump as Violence Proves Too Much". Bloomberg. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  351. ^ "Texas lawmakers react to pro-Trump mob breaching the US Capitol". Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  352. ^ Levine, Marianne; Otterbein, Holly; Everett, Burgess (January 9, 2021). "Election gambit blows up on Hawley and Cruz". Politico. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  353. ^ KMOV com Staff. "Sen. Hawley's campaign sends fundraising text at height of Capitol siege". KMOV.com. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  354. ^ Wallace, Jeremy (January 7, 2021). "Ted Cruz explains fundraising text sent during siege on US Capitol". HoustonChronicle.com. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  355. ^ David Edwards (January 10, 2021). "QAnon congresswoman faces calls for arrest after live-tweeting Nancy Pelosi's location to rioters". Raw Story.
  356. ^ Knowles, Hannah (January 6, 2021). "Insurrection: All four living former presidents denounce violence at the Capitol". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021.
  357. ^ Wagner, Meg; et al. (January 6, 2021). "President George W. Bush condemns riots: "This is how election results are disputed in a banana republic"". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  358. ^ "Former U.S. President Obama releases statement on chaos at U.S. Capitol". Dayton 24/7 Now. January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  359. ^ Perez, Evan (January 6, 2021). "Former Attorney General William Barr condemns Capitol mob as 'outrageous and despicable'". CNN. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  360. ^ Baker, Peter (January 7, 2021). "Live Updates: Calls for Trump's Removal as Biden Forges Ahead with Justice Picks". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  361. ^ "'Stop this now.' SC Republican Leaders Sound Off as Pro-Trump Rioters Breach Capitol". Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  362. ^ a b c Macias, Amanda (January 7, 2021). "'I can't stay here' – Mick Mulvaney resigns from Trump administration, expects others to follow". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  363. ^ Seligman, Lara (January 6, 2021). "Mattis blames Trump for inciting 'mob rule'". Politico. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021.
  364. ^ Collins, Kaitlan (January 6, 2021). "Trump's former homeland security adviser says the President is "culpable for this siege"". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021.
  365. ^ "Pence evacuated, Capitol locked down as protesters push through fence, breach building". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  366. ^ Bohatch, Emily (January 6, 2021). "'Stop this now.' SC Republican leaders sound off as pro-Trump rioters breach Capitol". The State. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  367. ^ Isenstadt, Alex (January 7, 2021). "Haley criticizes Trump over Capitol riot, election claims in RNC speech". Politico.
  368. ^ Gstalter, Morgan (January 7, 2021). "Scarborough calls for arrest of Trump, Giuliani and Trump Jr. for insurrection against US". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  369. ^ a b Moran, Lee (January 7, 2021). "Joe Scarborough Drops F-Bomb In Fiery On-Air Takedown Of Donald Trump, Capitol Police". HuffPost. Verizon Media. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  370. ^ "Siege of the U.S. Capitol "was a total failure of security," former CIA leader says". CBS News. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  371. ^ "Domestic Terrorism Strikes U.S. Capitol, and Democracy". Council on Foreign Relations. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  372. ^ Duster, Chandelis (January 11, 2021). "Colin Powell says he no longer considers himself a Republican". CNN. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  373. ^ Matt Arco and Brent Johnson (January 7, 2021). "Chris Christie unloads on Trump after Capitol stormed by mob: 'I am just absolutely sickened by what I saw today'". nj. Retrieved January 10, 2021.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  374. ^ Madani, Doha (January 10, 2021). "Wielding Conan sword, Schwarzenegger blasts 'spinelessness' of fellow Republicans after Capitol riot". NBC News. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  375. ^ Lewis, Isobel (January 10, 2021). "Arnold Schwarzenegger compares Capitol riots to Kristallnacht". The Independent.
  376. ^ Campbell, Colin (January 10, 2021). "Schwarzenegger invokes Nazi Germany in powerful video denouncing Capitol Hill riot". news.yahoo.com. Yahoo News. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  377. ^ "U.S. diplomats make extraordinary protest against Trump after riot". Los Angeles Times. January 10, 2021.
  378. ^ Peters, Jeremy W. (January 7, 2021). "How Trump's Allies Are Still Defending Him: Denial, Deflection, Disinformation". The New York Times.
  379. ^ a b Bauder, David (January 7, 2021). "Conservative Media Decry Capitol Riot, but Grievances Remain". ABC News.
  380. ^ Ritschel, Chelsea (January 6, 2021). "Ivanka Trump deletes tweet calling pro-Trump rioters 'patriots'". The Independent. New York. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  381. ^ Barr, Jeremy (January 7, 2021). "'Not all Trump supporters': Conservative media tries to shift blame, cast doubt on identities of Capitol invaders". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  382. ^ Blum, Jeremy (January 7, 2021). "Rush Limbaugh Compares Violent Trump Mob To American Revolutionaries". HuffPost. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  383. ^ Feldman, Josh (January 6, 2021). "Lou Dobbs Criticizes Police for Pulling Guns on Pro-Trump Rioters: Why Would They Draw Weapons on Americans, 'Most of Whom Are Patriots?'". Mediaite. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  384. ^ Moran, Lee (January 7, 2021). "Fox News' Pete Hegseth Defends Capitol Rioters: They Just Love Freedom". HuffPost.
  385. ^ Graziosi, Graig (January 7, 2021). "Proud Boys boast they caused 'absolute terror' during Capitol riot". The Independent. Yahoo! News. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  386. ^ Cunningham, Patrick (January 6, 2021). "Texas GOP removes Sergeant-at-Arms after he endorses violence at Capitol Hill". KXAN-TV. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  387. ^ Katersky, Aaron; Darrough, Celia (January 11, 2021). "Armed protests being planned at all 50 state capitols, FBI bulletin says". ABC News. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  388. ^ Zitser, Joshua (January 3, 2021). "Far-right group Proud Boys claim they will attend January 6 DC rally 'incognito' and wear all-black to blend in with antifa protesters". Business Insider. Insider Inc. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  389. ^ Multiple sources:
  390. ^ Alba, Davey (January 8, 2021). "F.B.I. says there is no evidence antifa participated in storming the Capitol". The New York Times. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  391. ^ Demsas, Jerusalem (January 9, 2021). "The online far right is angry, exultant, and ready for more". Vox. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  392. ^ Smith, Matthew; Ballard, Jamie; Sanders, Linley (January 7, 2021). "Most voters say the events at the US Capitol are a threat to democracy". YouGov. YouGov PLC. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  393. ^ Castronuovo, Celine (January 7, 2021). "Poll: Majority of Republicans blame Biden for mob storming the Capitol". TheHill.
  394. ^ Kahn, Chris (January 8, 2021). "Majority of Americans want Trump removed immediately after U.S. Capitol violence – Reuters/Ipsos poll". Reuters. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  395. ^ Castronuovo, Celine (January 8, 2021). "Poll: 18 percent of Republicans support Capitol riots". The Hill. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  396. ^ Katz, A.J. (January 7, 2021). "CNN Has Most-Watched Day Ever With Capitol Insurrection Coverage". Adweek. Retrieved January 9, 2021./
  397. ^ Joyella, Mark (January 7, 2021). "Attack On Capitol Pushes CNN To Its Most-Watched Day In History". Forbes. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  398. ^ Johnson, Ted (January 7, 2021). "Networks See Spike In Viewers As Capitol Siege Played Out; CNN Has Most-Watched Day In Its History". Deadline. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  399. ^ Wemple, Erik (January 7, 2021). "Tucker Carlson's racist, riotous double standard". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  400. ^ Attiah, Karen (January 7, 2021). "How Western media would have covered the storming of the U.S. Capitol if it had happened in another country". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  401. ^ McGregor, Grady; Xu Elegant, Naomi (January 7, 2021). "Chinese state media is already using Capitol riots in its anti-U.S. narrative". Fortune. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  402. ^ Oliver Darcy (January 8, 2021). "Analysis: TV providers should not escape scrutiny for distributing disinformation". CNN Business. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  403. ^ Bruce Haring (January 9, 2021). "Fox News Host Tucker Carlson Claims CNN Trying To Force His Network Off The Air". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  404. ^ "Cumulus Media tells its conservative talk show hosts to stop talking about a stolen election". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  405. ^ "Capitol riots: Boris Johnson condemns Donald Trump for sparking events". BBC News. January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  406. ^ "Taoiseach and Foreign Affairs Minister react to Washington protests". echo live. January 6, 2021. Archived from the original on January 6, 2021. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  407. ^ "US Capitol riots: World leaders react to 'horrifying' scenes in Washington". BBC News. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  408. ^ "The Populists Finally Breaking With Trump". The Atlantic. January 9, 2021.
  409. ^ Ellyatt, Holly (January 7, 2021). "'Anarchy in the USA': Global Media Reacts to Capitol Chaos". WNBC. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  410. ^ "US Capitol riots: How the world's media reacted to Trump, his supporters and the storming of Congress". The West Australian. January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  411. ^ a b Prothero, Mitch (January 7, 2021). "Some among America's military allies believe Trump deliberately attempted a coup and may have had help from federal law-enforcement officials". Business Insider. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  412. ^ "Indian flag waved in the middle of mob at the attack on US Capitol building". The News Minute. TNM. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  413. ^ "Tharoor and Varun spat on Twitter over tricolour at Capitol". Times of India. ToI. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  414. ^ Desai, Suyash. "Donald Trump endorsement: India's calculated move". Deccan Herald. DH. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  415. ^ "US election result 2020: Hindu Sena performs 'havan', 'puja' for Donald Trump's victory". Business Today. BT. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  416. ^ Chazan, Guy; Foy, Henry; Murphy, Hannah (January 11, 2021). "Angela Merkel attacks Twitter over Trump ban". Financial Times. Financial Times. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  417. ^ Bodner, Matthew (January 11, 2021). "Russian opposition leader Navalny slams Trump ban as 'censorship'". NBC News. NBC News. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  418. ^ "A 'bad sign': World leaders and officials blast Twitter Trump ban". Al Jazeera. Al Jazeera. January 11, 2021. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  419. ^ a b c d e f Leonnig, Carol D.; Davis, Aaron C.; Lamothe, Dan; Fahrenthold, David A. (January 6, 2021). "Capitol breach prompts urgent questions about security failures". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  420. ^ Ignatius, David (January 7, 2021). "What went wrong with the protection of the U.S. Capitol". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  421. ^ Gramenz, Jack. "Vision emerges of police moving barricades to allow rioters into US Capitol, taking selfies". News.com.au. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  422. ^ Elis, Niv (January 6, 2021). "Capitol Police face heat following mob breach". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  423. ^ McSwane, Logan Jaffe,Lydia DePillis,Isaac Arnsdorf,J David (January 7, 2021). "Capitol Rioters Planned for Weeks in Plain Sight. The Police Weren't Ready". ProPublica. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  424. ^ "Congressman accuses US Capitol Police of being 'complicit' in rioters entering Capitol Building". Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  425. ^ Tavernise, Sabrina; Rosenberg, Matthew (January 7, 2021). "These Are the Rioters Who Stormed the Nation's Capitol". The New York Times. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  426. ^ a b c d Cheney, Kyle; Ferris, Sarah; Barrón-Lopez, Laura (January 8, 2021). "'Inside job': House Dems ask if Capitol rioters had hidden help". Politico. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  427. ^ a b Emma, Caitlin (January 6, 2021). "Capitol Police firings imminent after 'attempted coup,' top appropriator warns". Politico. Archived from the original on January 7, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  428. ^ Williams, Katie Bo. "Congress Launches Investigations into Capitol Police Following Siege". Defense One. Defense One. Retrieved January 9, 2021.
  429. ^ Nickeas, Peter; Grayer, Annie; Nobles, Ryan (January 11, 2021). "2 Capitol Police officers suspended and at least 10 more under investigation for alleged roles in riot". CNN. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  430. ^ a b Sadeghi, McKenzie (January 7, 2021). "Fact check: Viral images compare handling of Black Lives Matter protests and Capitol riot". USA Today. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  431. ^ Dewan, Shaila (January 7, 2021). "Capitol Breach Draws Sharp Condemnation of Law Enforcement". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021. And protesters on the left saw a stark double standard, saying they had been hit with rubber bullets, manhandled, surrounded and arrested while behaving peacefully during demonstrations against racial injustice over the summer.
  432. ^ a b Sanchez, Tatiana (January 7, 2021). "'America's double standard': Bay Area racial justice activists denounce police reaction to pro-Trump mob". San Francisco Chronicle. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021. It was another example of white privilege, Freelon said. White male privilege, he said. I'm disgusted and tired and overwhelmed.
  433. ^ a b Borger, Julian (January 6, 2021). "Maga v BLM: how police handled the Capitol mob and George Floyd activists – in pictures". The Guardian. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  434. ^ a b Tolan, Casey (January 9, 2021). "DC police made far more arrests at the height of Black Lives Matter protests than during Capitol clash". CNN. Retrieved January 10, 2021. DC police arrested more than five times as many people at the height of the Black Lives Matter protests last summer than they did during the day of insurrection at the Capitol, according to a CNN analysis of Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) data.
  435. ^ a b Chavez, Nicole (January 7, 2021). "Rioters breached US Capitol security on Wednesday. This was the police response when it was Black protesters on DC streets last year". CNN. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  436. ^ a b c d Aratani, Lauren (January 7, 2021). "'White privilege on display': police hypocrisy condemned after pro-Trump insurgence". The Guardian. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  437. ^ Fadel, Leila (January 9, 2021). "'Now The World Gets To See The Difference': BLM Protesters On The Capitol Attack". NPR.org. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  438. ^ a b c Brantley-Jones, Kiara; Cruz, Abby; Deliso, Meredith. "'Extraordinary dichotomy' in police response to Black Lives Matter protests, Capitol chaos: DC attorney general". ABC News. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  439. ^ Srikanth, Anagha (January 6, 2021). "How law enforcement handled the pro-Trump mob compared to Black Lives Matter protesters". The Hill. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  440. ^ Togoh, Isabel (January 6, 2021). "'What If They Were Black?': Commentators, Twitter Users Denounce 'Double Standard' As Cops Take Selfies With Capitol Protesters". Forbes. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  441. ^ Chavez, Nicole. "Rioters breached US Capitol security on Wednesday. This was the police response when it was Black protesters on DC streets last year". CNN. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  442. ^ Berry, Grace Hauck and Deborah Barfield. "'Double standard': Black lawmakers and activists decry police response to attack on US Capitol". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  443. ^ a b Borger, Julian (January 7, 2021). "Maga v BLM: how police handled the Capitol mob and George Floyd activists – in pictures". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  444. ^ Klemko, Robert; Kindy, Kimberly; Bellware, Kim; Hawkins, Derek. "Kid glove treatment of pro-Trump mob contrasts with strong-arm police tactics against Black Lives Matter, activists say". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  445. ^ "Photos show difference in how police responded to anti-racism protests and the siege at the U.S. Capitol". CBS News. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  446. ^ "National Guard activated for D.C. protests, with more restraints than in June, officials say". The Washington Post. January 4, 2021. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  447. ^ "Capitol Police Weren't Prepared for Rioters, Authorities Say". The Wall Street Journal. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  448. ^ Voght, Kara (January 8, 2021). "Democrat Introduces Bill to Investigate If Capitol Police Have Ties to White Supremacist Groups". Mother Jones. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  449. ^ "Pelosi calls for resignation of Capitol Police chief". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  450. ^ "U.S. Capitol Police chief resigning after mob attack". Honolulu Star-Advertiser. Associated Press. January 7, 2021. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  451. ^ a b Allison Klein, Capitol Police Chief Sund has stepped down, leaving earlier than expected, Washington Post (January 10, 2021).
  452. ^ Kashino, Marisa M. (January 7, 2021). "The FBI Wants Your Help Identifying Capitol Rioters". Washingtonian. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  453. ^ Paul P. Murphy, The FBI and DC police want the public to help identify Capitol rioters Archived January 8, 2021, at the Wayback Machine, CNN (January 7, 2021).
  454. ^ "Persons of Interest in Unrest-Related Offenses | mpdc" (PDF). Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia. Retrieved January 8, 2021. Anyone who can identify these individuals or who has knowledge of this incident should take no action but call police at (202) 727–9099 or text your tip to the Department's TEXT TIP LINE at 50411. The Metropolitan Police Department currently offers a reward of up of $1,000 to anyone who provides information that leads to the arrest and indictment of the person or persons responsible for a crime committed in District of Columbia.
  455. ^ "Capitol Violence". Federal Bureau of Investigations. Retrieved January 10, 2021. The FBI is seeking information that will assist in identifying individuals who are actively instigating violence in Washington, D.C.
  456. ^ Duncan, Ian (January 7, 2021). "Airlines, airports in D.C. area tighten security after Capitol riot as union cites 'mob mentality' among passengers". Washington Post. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  457. ^ "Trump's New Criminal Problem". Politico. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  458. ^ a b Cannon, Matt (January 8, 2021). "Josiah Colt, Capitol rioter pictured hanging from Senate balcony, begs forgiveness". Newsweek. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  459. ^ Dutton, Audrey; Scholl, Jacob (January 7, 2021). "Updated: Boise man who posted about storming U.S. Capitol now 'person of interest'". Idaho Statesman. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  460. ^ Coyle, Jake (January 11, 2021). "A theatre of propaganda: The Capitol, cameras and selfies". Times Colonist. Associated Press. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  461. ^ Larson, Erik (January 11, 2021). "Giuliani May Be Expelled by New York Bar Group Over Capitol Riot". Bloomberg. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  462. ^ a b c d Fazio, Marie (January 10, 2021). "Notable Arrests After the Riot at the Capitol". The New York Times. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  463. ^ "Thirteen Charged in Federal Court Following Riot at the United States Capitol: Approximately 40 charged in Superior Court" (Press release). United States Department of Justice, Office of Public Affairs. January 8, 2021.
  464. ^ a b Polantz, Katelyn; Scannell, Kara; LeBlanc, Paul (January 8, 2021). "Feds say police found a pickup truck full of bombs and guns near Capitol insurrection as wide-ranging investigation unfurls". CNN. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  465. ^ Hsu, Spencer S.; Kornfield, Meryl; Villegas, Paulina; Lamothe, Dan (January 10, 2021). "Two men who allegedly held zip ties in Capitol during riots being investigated by U.S. counterterrorism prosecutors". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  466. ^ "Capitol mob member who lounged at Nancy Pelosi's desk is arrested". The Guardian. January 8, 2021. Retrieved January 8, 2021.